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KnackForge: How to update Drupal 8 core?

24. März 2018 - 7:01
How to update Drupal 8 core?

Let's see how to update your Drupal site between 8.x.x minor and patch versions. For example, from 8.1.2 to 8.1.3, or from 8.3.5 to 8.4.0. I hope this will help you.

  • If you are upgrading to Drupal version x.y.z

           x -> is known as the major version number

           y -> is known as the minor version number

           z -> is known as the patch version number.

Sat, 03/24/2018 - 10:31

Amazee Labs: Practices - Amazee Agile Agency Survey Results - Part 9

vor 3 Stunden 28 Sekunden
Practices - Amazee Agile Agency Survey Results - Part 9

This is part 9 of our series processing the results of the Amazee Agile Agency Survey. Previously I wrote about client interactions; this time let’s focus on practices. How often do teams deploy code? Are they practising peer reviews, automated testing, pair programming or story mapping?

Josef Dabernig Tue, 01/23/2018 - 10:10

When asked about “How often does your team deploy code?”, 53% of the teams answered they would do deployments “Rolling / Whenever necessary”. 13.3% deploy “About once a week”, another 13.3% “About every two weeks” and 6.7% answered they would deploy “Daily”. The remaining chose to go with freeform answers such as different frequencies based on the dev/stage/live environments or that it would depend on the client.

For us at Amazee, the deployment schedule depends on the needs of the clients. Thanks to the automatization that our Amazee.io hosting environment provides, any team member can execute a deployment on their own if it makes sense. Some High-availability clients require a fixed deployment schedule that our team has programmed to happen every week, besides that only critical hotfixes would be deployed instantly out of the schedule. Most of our clients allow us to deploy whenever, yet if a downtime for more complex deployments is needed we usually try to schedule them outside of business hours. For global customers that run their website across the globe, we try to find the deployment slot that fits best and rely on a proxy server like Varnish that keeps serving anonymous users during a deployment downtime.


Our second question was geared towards finding out which agile practices would be used by teams and how important they are considered. Contestants were able to rate from “Unknown”, “Not needed”, “Tried but failed” to “Somewhat in use”, “Actively in use” up to “Very important”. The practice that was mostly unknown is Mob programming.  Story mapping is also widely unknown but also has a good number of constants rating it with “Somewhat in use”. Pair programming is somewhat in use for many but also has a good number of contestants who responded “Unknown” or “Not needed”. The practices mostly rated as “Very important” where Peer reviews/code reviews as well as User testing. Automated testing got a lot of votes for “Somewhat in use”, and a few ones rated it as “Very important”. Per-ticket branch test environments have been rated as “Somewhat in use” by many as well.

For us at Amazee, we do Peer & code reviews for every work increment within our Scrum teams. This ensures code quality, knowledge transfer and feedback between team members. Automated testing happens for mission-critical features. Vasi has an article with good arguments why you should invest in it. User testing is performed on about a third of our projects. Automated deployments, continuous integration and per-ticket branch test environment are extensively used thanks again to the Amazee.io hosting environment goodies. Pair programming is quite common for our teams. While we have experimented with mob programming for teaching purposes, our team didn’t entirely pick it up. Finally, story mapping is something that we started using recently with good results, but we don’t have too much experience with it, yet.

Which practices do you use and how often do you do deployments? Please leave us a comment below. If you are interested in Agile Scrum training, don’t hesitate to contact us.

Stay tuned for the last post where we’ll do a round up of the Agile Agency Survey.

Colorfield: Install Solr 7 for Drupal 8 Search API on Ubuntu 16.04

vor 4 Stunden 19 Minuten
Install Solr 7 for Drupal 8 Search API on Ubuntu 16.04 christophe Tue, 23/01/2018 - 08:51 A brief introduction to Search API Solr, an update on the ecosystem and how to get Search API 2.x working on a dev environment with multiple collections.

Drupal core announcements: Drupal 8 will require PHP 7.0 or higher starting March 6, 2019 (one year from now)

vor 11 Stunden 26 Minuten

Drupal 8 will require PHP 7.0 or higher starting March 6, 2019. Drupal 8 users who are running Drupal 8 on PHP 5.5 or PHP 5.6 should begin planning to upgrade their PHP version to 7.0 or higher. Drupal 8.6 will be the final Drupal 8 version to support PHP 5, and will reach end-of-life on March 6, 2019, when Drupal 8.7.0 is released. (If 8.7.0 is released before March 6, 2019, the release number for the end-of-life will be updated accordingly, but the end-of-life date will remain the same.)

When planning for which PHP version to upgrade to, consider that PHP 7.2 was released on November 30, 2017 and will remain supported longer than older PHP 7 versions.

Why is support being dropped for PHP 5.5 and 5.6?
  • PHP 5.5 has already reached official end-of-life in 2016. Following that, a growing number of the PHP libraries used by Drupal 8 have also started to discontinue support for PHP 5.5.
  • PHP 5.6 stopped receiving active support from PHP maintainers in January 2017. This means that it is no longer receiving bugfixes, even for some very serious bugs that impact Drupal development.
  • PHP 5.6 is the final PHP 5 version, so the PHP maintainers are providing two years of security fixes for PHP 5.6 beyond its active support, through December 2018. This is a few months after Drupal 8.6's scheduled release and well before Drupal 8.7 would be released.
  • Drupal 8's automated tests require the PHPUnit library, which will drop support for PHP 5.6 in February 2018. Several other third-party dependencies are also dropping PHP 5.6 support in their latest versions.
  • To minimize disruption for both Drupal users and Drupal developers, Drupal 8's support of PHP 5.5 and PHP 5.6 will end at the same time.

We understand that upgrading from PHP 5 to PHP 7 may require time to plan and deploy. We suggest upgrading to PHP 7 in 2018 (rather than waiting for Drupal 8.7.0’s release).

What if I'm using a hosting service that doesn't offer PHP 7?

A majority of PHP hosting providers already offer PHP 7. If you're using one that doesn't, we suggest asking that provider when they will make it available, and if it's not until after March 2019, leave a comment on our tracking issue linking to that hosting provider, so that we can better understand the outliers, and perhaps offer some help.

What if I'm at an organization that maintains its own hosting, and we're using Ubuntu 14.04, which bundles PHP 5.5?

You have a few options if you are using Ubuntu 14.04:

  1. The preferred option is to plan an upgrade to Ubuntu 18.04 (to be released on April 2018, 2018). This version will be the most future-compatible.
  2. Another option is to upgrade Ubuntu 16.04, which is available now. You may need to upgrade Ubuntu again in a couple years if you choose to upgrade to 16.04 now.
  3. Finally, you can choose to upgrade to a separate build of PHP. Ondřej Surý provides a widely used PPA for doing this.
When will Drupal 8 drop support for PHP 7.0?

Support for PHP 7.0 will continue until at least March 6, 2019. We do not yet know whether Drupal 8's PHP 7.0 support will continue past that date, but we will post another announcement as soon as the end of PHP 7.0 support has been scheduled. We recommend you update to PHP 7.1 or higher since those versions will be supported longer.

How does this affect Drupal 8 core development?

Backported fixes account for about 80% of all changes and must continue to work on PHP 5.5 and 5.6 throughout Drupal 8.6.x's support cycle. For this reason, no PHP 7-only changes will be made until the 8.8.x branch is opened in early 2019 (or 8.9.x if 8.8.0 is released in 2018). Once 8.8.x is opened, the library dependencies in that branch can be updated to versions that have a PHP 7.0 requirement, and the Drupal code itself in that branch can begin relying on PHP 7 features. (Drupal 8 release cycle information)

The automated test suite already defaults to using PHPUnit 6 on environments that use PHP 7, but falls back to PHPUnit 4 on PHP 5. The fallback will be removed in the 8.8.x branch.

Does this affect Drupal 7?

No. Drupal 7 remains compatible with PHP 5.2.4 and higher. A separate announcement will be issued if and when that changes.

PreviousNext: Ok Drupal - talking to Drupal

22. Januar 2018 - 22:57

In November 2017 I presented at Drupal South on using Dialogflow to power conversational interfaces with Drupal.

The video and slides are below, the demo in which I talk to Drupal starts in the first minute.

by Lee Rowlands / 23 January 2018 Tagged Conversational UI, Drupal 8, Chatbots, DrupalSouth

WeKnow: Survival guide to Backup & Restore MongoDB

22. Januar 2018 - 21:06
Survival guide to Backup & Restore MongoDB

Despite being on the market for over a decade, to many, MongoDB still carries a mythical tone with a hint of ‘wizardry’.

The popular misconception is that MongoDB is only suitable for hip startups and former startups that are still considered ‘hip’ and out of the box, such as AirBnB.

Even with all the buzz and talk around MongoDB, the adoption rate remains relatively low in comparison with other ‘standard’ relational database technologies. Not many seem to understand that to be successful in the world of code you must approach everything new with an open mind.

Besides bearing an open mind, you need to incorporate an avenue to test and learn new technologies and tools. Personally, I choose to learn how to use new tools by trying to accomplish routine tasks.

enzo Mon, 01/22/2018 - 19:06

Mediacurrent: Power your Drupal 8 Project with Docksal

22. Januar 2018 - 16:09

Hello and welcome to my first blog post for Mediacurrent! Today’s post will be all about Docksal and how it can help you get up and running developing on Drupal 8 quickly and easily. This post was inspired by the great session I saw at DrupalCon 2017 and will explain how using Docksal will save you time getting up and running for a new Drupal development project. I’ll also talk about some of the technologies behind Docksal such as Docker and Oracle VM VirtualBox.
 

Amazee Labs: What the hell is GraphQL?

22. Januar 2018 - 12:16
What the hell is GraphQL?

With the growing popularity of GraphQL, the obligatory host of more or less founded opinions - trying to tell you that it's all just a hype - is also on the rise throughout the internet. 

Some of them have a point, some don’t, and you bet we have an opinion too.

Philipp Melab Mon, 01/22/2018 - 11:16

The end of the year is now way past us and I crunched some numbers. The most frequent question I’ve been asked was: «Philipp, could you mute yourself? Your keyboard is very loud.» But that one wouldn't promise a good blog post. So, instead, I will write about the second most frequently asked question: «Why would you use GraphQL instead of REST?»

Honestly, because I wanted to avoid a discussion, which I knew would take too long, I often gave one of the following diplomatic answers: «They serve different use cases.», «It’s a matter of taste.», «GraphQL can’t do everything …»

So here’s my new years' confession: I lied

Common perception of GraphQL

When reading opinions about GraphQL distinct patterns keep popping up. Let's have a look at them. 

GraphQL is there to reduce HTTP requests

When fetching complex related data sets with REST, you need to issue multiple requests. GraphQL avoids that by specifying all information requirements upfront. This is true, but just a small part of the picture. HTTP2 would be a better option to just reduce the overhead of multiple requests, without turning everything else upside down.

GraphQL is a supplement to React

That is a widespread misunderstanding since GraphQL was born out of requirements that emerged with complex Javascript clients, which in turn happen to be implemented with React quite often these days. But GraphQL doesn’t make any assumptions about the client technology it is consumed with. It doesn’t even assume it’s used above HTTP.

GraphQL is not cacheable

A GraphQL query may contain information from different entities, varying fields with arbitrary naming and therefore responses can’t be cached. Responses can be cached, but it’s harder. Besides, it is part of the client’s responsibility to construct queries intelligently, so they can be cached instead of blindly cramming everything into one request.

GraphQL is insecure

Or a less drastic wording: GraphQL has a larger attack surface. Depending on your application, that’s true. Since one query can request a cascading amount of related entities, there’s a lot more potential for something going south. This can be mitigated by designing the schema in a way that doesn’t allow funky constructs or using static query complexity analysis to reject queries that could get out of hand. But both approaches require experience and engineering. It’s definitely easier to safeguard a REST API.

GraphQL is a replacement for REST

That's the big misunderstanding. In my opinion, GraphQL shouldn’t be perceived as an alternative to REST, but as the layer underneath. Conceptually, a REST endpoint is nothing but a persisted GraphQL query.

From a consumers perspective, GraphQL can do anything REST can. Period. There is no valid reason to choose REST over GraphQL.

From a providers perspective, the reduced subset of actions and predictable responses of a REST API are a lot easier to manage.

GraphQL’s elevator pitch

This brings me to the 3rd most asked question of 2017: What’s GraphQL’s elevator pitch?

GraphQL shifts control from data storage and structures to client and product development.

This also answers the question of “when” to use GraphQL: Whenever you want your client to be more powerful. This might not be the case for a public HTTP API. But whenever you control the client, GraphQL is the better choice. And keep in mind that “client” doesn’t necessarily mean web browser, React frontend or smartphone application. GraphQL provides a structured way to describe information requirements that are not limited to HTTP.

It is for example possible to use GraphQL in combination with Twig to turn Drupal’s push-based rendering model upside down and give theme developers all the power they longed for. But this story has already been told.

PreviousNext: Managing Composer Github access with Personal Access Tokens

22. Januar 2018 - 5:20

All PreviousNext Drupal 8 projects are now managed using Composer. This is a powerful tool, and allows our projects to define both public and private modules or libraries, and their dependencies, and bring them all together.

 

However, a if you require public or private modules which are hosted on GitHub you may run into the API Rate Limits. In order to overcome this, it is recommended to add a GitHub personal access token to your composer configuration.

 

In this blog post, I'll show how you can do this in a secure and manageable way.

by Kim Pepper / 22 January 2018

It's common practice when you encounter a Drupal project to see the following snippet in a composer.json file:

"config": { "github-oauth": { "github.com": "XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX" } },

What this means is, everyone is sharing a single account's personal access token. While this may be convenient, it's also a major security risk should the token accidentally be made public, or a team member leaves the organisation, and still has read/write access to your repositories.

A better approach, is to have each team member have their own personal access token configure locally. This ensures that individuals can only access repositories they have read permissions for, and once they leave your organisation they can no longer access any private dependencies.

Step 1: Create a personal access token

Go to https://github.com/settings/tokens and generate a new token.

You will need to specify all repo scopes.

Finally, hit Generate Token to create the token.

Copy this, as well need it in the next step.

Step 2: Configure Composer to use your personal access token

Run the following from the command line:

composer config -g github-oauth.github.com XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

You're all set! From now on, composer will use your own individual personal access token which is stored in $HOME/.composer/auth.json

What about Automated Testing Environments?

Fortunately, composer also accepts an environment variable COMPOSER_AUTH with a JSON-formatted string as an argument. For example:

COMPOSER_AUTH='{"github-oauth": {"github.com": "XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX"}}'

You can simply set this environment variable in your CI Environment (e.g. CircleCI, TravisCI, Jenkins) and have a personal access token specific to the CI environment.

Summary

By using Personal Access Tokens, you can now safely remove any tokens from the project's composer.json file, removing the risk this gets exposed. You can also know that by removing access for any ex-team members, they are no longer able to access your organisations repos using a token. Finally, in the event of a token being compromised, you have reduced the attack surface, and can more easily identify which user's token was used.

 

Tagged Composer, Security, Drupal Security

fluffy.pro. Drupal Developer's blog: Monolog: namespaced logger?

21. Januar 2018 - 21:47
Using monolg library and monolog-cascade extension you can't configure the "namespaced" loggers. What does it mean? Imagine you have tons of classes and you need to log information from them into a log file. There is nothing special in this. Just define loggers with the needed handler(s) and instantiate them directly in a place where you want them to use with a help of monolog-cascade. It means in your monolog-cascade config file you have to define needed loggers in advance and you have to reference needed loggers by their names. But what if you need an additional logger (with absolutely different handlers/processors) for some of the classes? Will you go through all the classes and change logger names where you instantiate them? I think it doesn't look like a good idea when a small requirement (for instance, change the log file name for records from a bunch of classes) leads to edits in an application code. It's something that must be configurable and that's why I decided to write a tiny library called monolog-cascade-namespaced.
Read more »

DrupalEasy: Testing a local Drupal site emails with Lando and Mailhog

21. Januar 2018 - 19:29

Over the past few months, I've been evaluating three Docker-based local development environments trying to figure out which is best not only for me, but also for students of our long-form Managing Professional Drupal Development Workflows with Pantheon (next semester starts February 17) and Drupal Career Online (March 26) classes.

I've been test driving Docksal (actually, I've been using it for over a year), DDEV Community, and Lando (I'm a recovering Kalabox user) trying to figure out where the "sweet spot" is for flexibility, ease of use, documentation, Windows-compatibility (we routinely have students on Windows machines), performance, and some other criteria.

I recently stumbled upon a cool open source project (thanks Brian!) called Mailhog that makes it dead easy to test outgoing emails from a local development environment. While I tested it on Lando, both Docksal and DDEV both support Mailhog and have supporting documentation here and here

The general idea of Mailhog is that it acts as a local STMP server that by default, doesn't send emails to the addressed recipients. Rather, it includes a clean UI that allows the developer to view outgoing emails. 

Getting Mailhog up-and-running in an existing Lando site is quite easy. Simply add the following to your .lando.yml

 

proxy:
  mailhog:
    - mail.lemp.lndo.site
services:
  mailhog:
    type: mailhog
    hogfrom:
      - appserver


Then, run "lando rebuild". Caution should be used when using this command, as while most services retain their data during a rebuild, some may not. So far, I can confirm that my databases come through just fine. 

After rebuilding, you're just about done. When you run "lando start" the next time, you'll see a new set of URLs for the local Mailhog UI (you can also get this information via "lando info").

 

 

On your local Drupal site, if you're using the SMTP module or another SMTP-based sending solution, be sure to disable it:

 

 

Then, sending an email from a local contact form (screenshot shows a local copy of DrupalEasy.com):

 

 

Results in this in the Mailhog UI:

 

 

Then, if you want to "release" a message to its intended recipient, Mailhog provides you the option to do that as well via a button when viewing an email:

 

 

The button leads to an SMTP settings form:

 

 

Summarizing, regardless of if you're using Lando, Docksal, DDEV, or another local development stack, Mailhog is a great tool to help you test sending emails from your local development environments. 

While the screenshots in the blog post demonstrate setting up Mailhog with Lando, I can confirm that the process is just as easy with Docksal using the documentation, as I was able to configure it for a local client site in about 5 minutes.

For more information about using Mailhog with Lando, see the official documentation page.  
 

Matt Glaman: Drupal, Coffee, Burgers - A small world afterall

20. Januar 2018 - 18:00
Drupal, Coffee, Burgers - A small world afterall mglaman Sat, 01/20/2018 - 10:00 This year I joined a coffee exchange for some members of the Drupal community. I had known there was one floating around, but finally got signed up. Over the past two years, I have gotten more and more into coffee - being a coffee snob about roasts and learning brewing techniques. Last week we were paired up. And sent out some roasts.

Eelke Blok: Preparing your Drupal 8.3 site with Media for Drupal 8.4

20. Januar 2018 - 16:36

If you have the Media module for Drupal 8 installed, you need to remove it before you can upgrade to the latest core version (8.4). Unfortunately, there are a few gotchas involved with the process. This blog post is about getting rid of the old contrib Media module, so the site can be updated to Drupal 8.4 in a subsequent step. This is based on my personal experience. YMMV, as they say.

Drupal Console: Drupal Console 1.5.0

20. Januar 2018 - 4:20

Drupal Console 1.5.0 is out. The newest release contains bug fixes and one new command.

Acquia Developer Center Blog: Acquia Headless Lightning and Content API

19. Januar 2018 - 23:10

Acquia Headless Lightning provides an API-first back-end content repository that allows for easy ingestion by front-end applications.

Front-end developers requiring a headless or decoupled CMS have immediate access to a cloud-hosted content repository service for development, delivering, and production.

Tags: acquia drupal planet

Acro Media: Drupal Commerce 2: How to set up Product Attributes

19. Januar 2018 - 18:27

In this five part Acro Media Tech Talk video series, we use our Urban Hipster Commerce 2 demo site to show you how to set up a new product in Drupal Commerce 2, from start to finish. This is the first video in the series, How to set up Product Attributes.

If you're creating a whole new product type from scratch, the first thing you want to do is setup any product attributes that your product needs. For example, a shirt product type may have a number of sizes (small, medium, large) and colours available to choose from. Size and colour are both product attributes. As a site administrator, you'll use the attributes to configure your product variations. As a customer, your'll use the attributes to pick the exact product that you want to purchase.

Next week we'll post part 2: Product Attributes using Rendered Fields

Its important to note that this video was recorded before the official 2.0 release of Drupal Commerce and so you may see a few small differences between this video and the official release now available.

Urban Hipster Commerce 2 Demo site

This video was created using the Urban Hipster Commerce 2 demo site. We've built this site to show the adaptability of the Drupal 8, Commerce 2 platform. Most of what you see is out-of-the-box functionality combined with expert configuration and theming.

More from Acro Media Drupal modules used in this video

DrupalEasy: DrupalEasy Podcast 203 - David Hernandez (New Jersey, Governance, Docksal, tiny zoos)

19. Januar 2018 - 15:36

Direct .mp3 file download.

David Hernandez, (davidhernandez), one of the DrupalCamp New Jersey organizers as well as one of the "evolution of Drupal governance" volunteers and Manager of Learning and Contributions at FFW and an Acquia certified Grand Master joins Mike Anello to talk about all of this roles (and a few more), trends in Drupal meetups, regional camps, and DrupalCons, event organizer burnout, and Docksal. In addition, we really had to work to figure out the answer to one of the "five questions".

Interview DrupalEasy News Sponsors Upcoming Events Follow us on Twitter Subscribe

Subscribe to our podcast on iTunes, Google Play or Miro. Listen to our podcast on Stitcher.
If you'd like to leave us a voicemail, call 321-396-2340. Please keep in mind that we might play your voicemail during one of our future podcasts. Feel free to call in with suggestions, rants, questions, or corrections. If you'd rather just send us an email, please use our contact page.

mark.ie: Out of the Box has just been Committed to Drupal Core 8.6.x

19. Januar 2018 - 15:30
Out of the Box has just been Committed to Drupal Core 8.6.x

After two years of planning, discussing, and (eventually) coding, the "Out of the Box" initiative has just been committed to Drupal Core.

markconroy Fri, 01/19/2018 - 13:30

One of the things most often requested of Drupal has been a better experience "Out of the Box", so that when a new users installs it they see something more positive than a message saying "You have not created any frontpage content yet".

To that end, a strategic initiative called the "Out of the Box Initiative" was set up. I was a member of that team. What we sought to do over the past two years was create a website for a (fictional) publishing company. We decided upon the name "Umami" for a food publishing company, publishing articles and recipes. We went through the full web design process - user stories, validation, requirements gathering, wireframes, design, development ... up to creating what we called the "MEGA Patch". And then submitted about 50 versions of it.

This week we hoped our work would be committed to Drupal 8.5.0-alpha1, but we just missed that deadline. Instead, we had a meeting with the product owners last night to have the final "Needs Product Owners Review" tag removed from the "Create experimental installation profile" issue. Here's the video of that demonstration and meeting:

Following that meeting, the tag was removed and our code was committed to Drupal 8.6.x. This means you'll see it shipping in Drupal in September at the latest, but we hope to get the final beta blockers fixed to have it backported to 8.5.0-beta. If you'd like to help squash some of the bugs, follow these "Out of the Box" issues. Here's the tweet from @webchick (THANKS!) announcing it:

So, what is in this commit?

This commit brings a new installation profile to Drupal. The profile is called "Umami" and has a corresponding "Umami" theme. It creates three content types - basic page, article, and recipe. It has listing pages for articles and recipes, some promotional blocks, a homepage, contact form, and search page. It is a fully-featured (small) website built using only (stable) Drupal core modules.

We are not using experimental modules such as content moderation, layout builder, media, etc. Once they are stable, we hope to bring them into the "Out of the Box" experience as well.

If you'd like to install it, try this link on SimplyTest.me.

TIP Solutions: 17-years of development behind

19. Januar 2018 - 13:08

Happy anniversary!

Another year of work behind which means thousands of patches, new iniatives and modules. Simple put: ever more modern and robust platform to create web applications and sites.

An article [1] published by Drupal association they gave some recent figures about the development of the framework from last year from which some interesting were:

Planet Drupal Community Drupal

Agiledrop.com Blog: AGILEDROP: Interview with Igor, our Development manager

19. Januar 2018 - 10:10
We have sat down with our Development manager, Igor and ask him a couple of questions. Enjoy the interview.   When did you start working at AGILEDROP and what were your initial responsibilities? I started working at Agiledrop in September 2015 as a junior developer. At first, I was working mainly as a frontend developer with some small site building tasks so that I got more familiar with Drupal (I didn’t work with Drupal before). After few weeks I got more and more backend tasks and soon I became Drupal backend developer. Initially, I was there to learn Drupal and try to improve my… READ MORE