Hamburger Fotofahndung - 20 mutmaßliche G20-Gewalttäter ermittelt

heise online Newsticker - 23. Januar 2018 - 10:00
Vor einem Monat hat die Hamburger Polizei mehr als 100 Fotos von mutmaßlichen G20-Gewalttätern im Internet veröffentlicht. Das Vorgehen zahlt sich für die Ermittler offensichtlich aus, stößt aber weiterhin auf Kritik.

Daten von 40.000 Kreditkarten bei OnePlus kompromittiert

heise online Newsticker - 23. Januar 2018 - 10:00
Durch Einschleusen von Schadcode in die Payment-Seite des Smartphone-Herstellers OnePlus konnten die kompletten Kreditkartendaten von 40.000 Kunden abgegriffen werden.

Twitter findet weitere Accounts mit Russland-Verbindung

heise online Newsticker - 23. Januar 2018 - 10:00
Twitter hat zahlreiche weitere aus Russland gesteuerte Accounts aufgedeckt, die offenbar dazu gedient hatten, den Ausgang der US-Präsidentschaftswahl 2016 zu beeinflussen.

Colorfield: Install Solr 7 for Drupal 8 Search API on Ubuntu 16.04

Planet Drupal - 23. Januar 2018 - 9:51
Install Solr 7 for Drupal 8 Search API on Ubuntu 16.04 christophe Tue, 23/01/2018 - 08:51 A brief introduction to Search API Solr, an update on the ecosystem and how to get Search API 2.x working on a dev environment with multiple collections.

Facebook zieht Nutzer zur Qualitätskontrolle heran

heise online Newsticker - 23. Januar 2018 - 9:00
Seit der US-Präsidentschaftswahl 2016 wird Facebook wegen der Verbreitung von Falschmeldungen heftig kritisiert. Nach einem ersten Versuch, Recherche-Profis Warnzeichen setzen zu lassen, rekrutiert das Online-Netzwerk nun seine Mitglieder.

Kim Dotcom hat geheiratet - und will Neuseeland verklagen

heise online Newsticker - 23. Januar 2018 - 9:00
Auf Twitter hat der umstrittene Internetunternehmer Kim Schmitz (44) seine Hochzeit bekannt gegeben.

Neuer Miniaturisierungsrekord bei Delta-Robotern

heise online Newsticker - 23. Januar 2018 - 8:30
Forscher der Harvard University haben Industrieroboter auf eine Größe von wenigen Millimetern geschrumpft.

Korg Prologue: Synthesizer-Flaggschiff verbindet analoge und digitale Klangerzeugung

heise online Newsticker - 23. Januar 2018 - 8:30
Der 16-fach polyphone Prologue-16 verknüpft die analoge Tonerzeugung des Minilogue mit digitalen Oszillatoren und Effekten, die sich per Software am PC manipulieren lassen. Der Sound ist gewaltig.

Wochenrückblick Replay: Banken, Bitcoin, Brute Force (und natürlich Meltdown)

heise online Newsticker - 23. Januar 2018 - 8:30
Meltdown und Spectre haben uns weiter auf Trab gehalten. Aber in den meistgelesenen Meldungen der vergangenen Woche geht es um Bankenregulierung, abstürzende Kryptowährungen und die Trottel von Apple.

c't uplink 20.6: Meltdown und Spectre

heise online Newsticker - 23. Januar 2018 - 8:00
Großer Schwerpunkt in der aktuellen c't sind die Prozessor-Sicherheitslücken Meltdown und Spectre. In unserem Podcast aus Nerdistan widmen wir uns den Lücken und klären, was es damit auf sich hat und wie schlimm das alles wirklich ist.

Drupal core announcements: Drupal 8 will require PHP 7.0 or higher starting March 6, 2019 (one year from now)

Planet Drupal - 23. Januar 2018 - 2:43

Drupal 8 will require PHP 7.0 or higher starting March 6, 2019. Drupal 8 users who are running Drupal 8 on PHP 5.5 or PHP 5.6 should begin planning to upgrade their PHP version to 7.0 or higher. Drupal 8.6 will be the final Drupal 8 version to support PHP 5, and will reach end-of-life on March 6, 2019, when Drupal 8.7.0 is released. (If 8.7.0 is released before March 6, 2019, the release number for the end-of-life will be updated accordingly, but the end-of-life date will remain the same.)

When planning for which PHP version to upgrade to, consider that PHP 7.2 was released on November 30, 2017 and will remain supported longer than older PHP 7 versions.

Why is support being dropped for PHP 5.5 and 5.6?
  • PHP 5.5 has already reached official end-of-life in 2016. Following that, a growing number of the PHP libraries used by Drupal 8 have also started to discontinue support for PHP 5.5.
  • PHP 5.6 stopped receiving active support from PHP maintainers in January 2017. This means that it is no longer receiving bugfixes, even for some very serious bugs that impact Drupal development.
  • PHP 5.6 is the final PHP 5 version, so the PHP maintainers are providing two years of security fixes for PHP 5.6 beyond its active support, through December 2018. This is a few months after Drupal 8.6's scheduled release and well before Drupal 8.7 would be released.
  • Drupal 8's automated tests require the PHPUnit library, which will drop support for PHP 5.6 in February 2018. Several other third-party dependencies are also dropping PHP 5.6 support in their latest versions.
  • To minimize disruption for both Drupal users and Drupal developers, Drupal 8's support of PHP 5.5 and PHP 5.6 will end at the same time.

We understand that upgrading from PHP 5 to PHP 7 may require time to plan and deploy. We suggest upgrading to PHP 7 in 2018 (rather than waiting for Drupal 8.7.0’s release).

What if I'm using a hosting service that doesn't offer PHP 7?

A majority of PHP hosting providers already offer PHP 7. If you're using one that doesn't, we suggest asking that provider when they will make it available, and if it's not until after March 2019, leave a comment on our tracking issue linking to that hosting provider, so that we can better understand the outliers, and perhaps offer some help.

What if I'm at an organization that maintains its own hosting, and we're using Ubuntu 14.04, which bundles PHP 5.5?

You have a few options if you are using Ubuntu 14.04:

  1. The preferred option is to plan an upgrade to Ubuntu 18.04 (to be released on April 2018, 2018). This version will be the most future-compatible.
  2. Another option is to upgrade Ubuntu 16.04, which is available now. You may need to upgrade Ubuntu again in a couple years if you choose to upgrade to 16.04 now.
  3. Finally, you can choose to upgrade to a separate build of PHP. Ondřej Surý provides a widely used PPA for doing this.
When will Drupal 8 drop support for PHP 7.0?

Support for PHP 7.0 will continue until at least March 6, 2019. We do not yet know whether Drupal 8's PHP 7.0 support will continue past that date, but we will post another announcement as soon as the end of PHP 7.0 support has been scheduled. We recommend you update to PHP 7.1 or higher since those versions will be supported longer.

How does this affect Drupal 8 core development?

Backported fixes account for about 80% of all changes and must continue to work on PHP 5.5 and 5.6 throughout Drupal 8.6.x's support cycle. For this reason, no PHP 7-only changes will be made until the 8.8.x branch is opened in early 2019 (or 8.9.x if 8.8.0 is released in 2018). Once 8.8.x is opened, the library dependencies in that branch can be updated to versions that have a PHP 7.0 requirement, and the Drupal code itself in that branch can begin relying on PHP 7 features. (Drupal 8 release cycle information)

The automated test suite already defaults to using PHPUnit 6 on environments that use PHP 7, but falls back to PHPUnit 4 on PHP 5. The fallback will be removed in the 8.8.x branch.

Does this affect Drupal 7?

No. Drupal 7 remains compatible with PHP 5.2.4 and higher. A separate announcement will be issued if and when that changes.

Palantir: What “Content” Means to Different Teams

Planet Drupal - 23. Januar 2018 - 0:21
What “Content” Means to Different Teams brandt Mon, 01/22/2018 - 16:21 Ken Rickard Jan 23, 2018

The importance of aligning editorial, marketing, design, and development.

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As we’ve discussed before, understanding the content on your website is a critical element in the project plan. Today, we’d like to step back a bit and talk about how different teams in an organization might think about content.

First, let’s define our common teams by function:

  • The Editorial team produces and maintains content for the site.
  • The Marketing team sets strategy and metrics around successful audience engagement and interactions.
  • The UX Design team creates the strategy, visual and interactive components that comprise the site’s features.
  • The Development team builds and supports the site so that it fulfills the needs defined by the other three teams.

Note that these teams may all be organized within a single department (commonly marketing) or spread across the organization. Our concern here is not with organizational structure but rather with the perspective and concerns that are inherent in each team.

When teams start work on a new site or a site redesign, the most common mistake is for these four teams to work in silos, as if their individual tasks are unrelated to each other. In this case, a number of issues may arise:

  • A design may include elements that place extra burden on the editorial team.
  • An editorial workflow may require the development of custom code.
  • A marketing plan may ignore the limited editorial and design resources available to achieve its goals.
  • Organizations that have a history of heavily relying on non-digital media for marketing and promotions may have to figure out how to incorporate and plan for the digital work into the existing workflow.
  • A CMS implementation may not be able to produce certain essential design features, or budget and timeline prevents features from being designed a certain way.

Working together, teams can work through these types of issues before they become problems. To do so, it’s vital to get everyone speaking the same language around your content. We like to look at five specific factors when helping teams define their content strategy:

  • Audience defines the users and their needs and answers “who is this for?”
  • Purpose asks the question “what end result are we hoping to achieve?”
  • Workflow deals with the mechanics of content production, approval, publication, and presentation.
  • Transformation explores issues of translation and personalization, so that we define how the content might be modified in distinct contexts.
  • Structure defines the input and storage of the content and how it will be delivered to various publication media. The structure is directly affected by the needs outlined by the three previous items.

Each of these elements has a direct effect on each of our project teams. To understand how, Let’s take a look at Dr. Gillinov’s bio page at Cleveland Clinic to see how these questions bring focus to our project goals.

 

There are many elements that make up this comprehensive profile page and they all require each team member mentioned above to consider the following:

  1. Where does the data/content come from?
  2. What pieces of data/content is the editor responsible for?
  3. What does this page look like if it has all of the possible content types vs. physicians who have very little information?

For the purposes of this discussion, however, let’s focus on the top portion of the page addressing the data/content that makes up Dr. Gillinov’s basic information as it will help us illustrate our points.The first thing we look for here is the number of elements within the design pattern and how they might be produced. At first count, there are 11:

Let’s see how those elements break down.

  1. Picture – an uploaded image of the person.
  2. Video Link – a link to an external video service
  3. Rating – 1-5 stars based on patient feedback
  4. Rating Count – the number of patient ratings
  5. Comment Count – the number of patient comments
  6. Name – the name and honorifics for this person
  7. Department – the assigned internal department
  8. Primary Location – the main office location for this person
  9. Type of Doctor – indicates pediatrician, adult physician, or both
  10. Languages – a list of languages spoken
  11. Surgeon – indicates that this person is a licensed surgeon
Audience

There are multiple types of users that would view this page: potential patients, existing patients, families of patients, and medical professionals. Their needs are different based on who they are and where they are in their care journey.

Purpose

The primary purpose of this specific component is to provide basic information to the audience. The information presented helps them understand the services and availability of this doctor. The use of a picture and a video are designed to build trust by establishing a human connection in addition to the facts presented.

The inclusion of patient ratings serves as an impartial arbiter of the quality of services provided, while the department and location information helps people understand where they can go to receive treatment.

Workflow

For this example, the important question is “Which part of this page is editorial and which part is automated?” Here, the ratings pull in from a secondary system, which the editors do not control. The video is merely a link reference, but is editorial data. And while some of the doctor information might be pulled from an external system, here we assume that it can be edited for display on the web.

There is also an unlisted assumption here – call it feature #12 – about whether or not this doctor has active privileges at the hospital. Our editorial workflow needs to account for when an individual physician changes jobs, retires, or moves away.

Transformations

We use the term “transformations” here as a bit of a catch-all to describe how the data might need to change in different contexts. A common context shift is language.

When considering a multilingual website, we need to evaluate each element of the page for the desirability and feasibility of its translation.

Take the Video field for instance: Translating the link text for a video is trivial, but does the video itself need to be recorded in multiple languages (or at least subtitled)? Does it make sense to show a Spanish translation of the video link if the video is only in English?

The other most common transformation is personalization, wherein content elements are transformed based on our understanding of who the reader is and what they care about.

The key factor to consider about personalization is that it can create exponentially more work for the editorial team. Consider that for each element that desires personalization, we must create one new version for each variation. Let’s say that we want to segment our audience experience by three data points:

  • Returning patient (yes / no)
  • Local resident (yes / no)
  • Age cohort (child / adult / senior)

Now our one piece of content needs 2 x 2 x 3 = 12 variants, plus the original. For clarity, here’s how that looks mapped out: 

If we add in cases where one of the answers is not known, then the math becomes 3 x 3 x 4 = 36 plus the original variant.

As you can imagine, keeping track of those options can become a heavy editorial burden quite quickly if we were to personalize multiple elements on a page.

Structure

The above questions help inform how this page is structured on the back end. Additionally, we have to consider:

  • What fields do we need to capture and report this data?
  • What format should the data be displayed in?
  • What services (other than the website) might consume this data?
  • In what other contexts might this data be shown?

This last question gives an easy example of the type of decision that your programmers may need to make. To fully understand, let’s look for a minute at the contexts of a search result.

Here, the results are alphabetized by the physician’s last name. If we were to enter the physician’s name as it appears in English, “A. Mark Gillinov, MD”, a computer cannot natively sort by last name. We should also consider whether the honorific “MD” should influence sort order, and whether to sort by first and last name in the case of multiple matches to a common surname.

That generally leads to a separation of the sort field into a 14th field concept: Sort name. In our example the sort name is likely to be “Gillinov Mark A.” The remaining question is whether editors should provide that detail or if it should be automatically inferred by a custom element in the CMS.

Additionally, look at the elements that contain links:

  • Video
  • Ratings
  • Department
  • Primary Location

The target of these links needs to be captured, and the logic for that link generation accounted for in the CMS architecture. Further, can these elements be automatically derived from existing data (like the doctor’s name) or are they “hidden” metadata points that need to be added?

In most cases, the mapping for these elements is based on metadata:

  • Video – requires a unique URL for a YouTube video.
  • Ratings – requires a physician ID number provided by the ratings service.
  • Department –  selected from a list of Department pages controlled by the CMS.
  • Primary Location – selected from a list of Location pages controlled by the CMS and containing mapping metadata.

And to add one more element to the structure question: Which of these page elements allow for multiple selection? Can a doctor be part of two departments? Have three primary locations?

Making the Complex Simple

These kinds of workflow complexities in your data are absolutely essential to capture as early in the design process as possible. What if we find that “Languages spoken” is very important to patients, but not currently available in our information set? That requires additional editorial work – and likely a staff-wide survey – that could take weeks to complete simply due to the coordination involved. It is also worth mentioning the impact on initial design choices as well. For example, do we need to consider fonts that have text alternates for language glyphs? Does the design still hold up (spacing, line length, relationship to imagery etc) when there is twice as much French text as English?

Since we’re working directly with Marketing to define our audience and purpose of each page, we should understand how each element of the design improves the overall user experience. That knowledge allows the entire team to make informed decisions about the level of effort to produce and maintain each content element.

All members of the team should have a familiarity and respect for the concerns of other members of the team. When developing and planning content, it is imperative to involve all four teams as early in the process as possible. To bring your content into focus, always ask the following questions about any design or content element shown in a wireframe or mockup:

  • What content or data will be needed to produce this element?
  • Does this content or data already exist in a usable format?
  • What format will this data be entered and stored in?
  • Will this element be editorially curated or automatically produced?
    • If automated, do we have business logic to support that automation?
    • If curated, do we have the staff time to support that creation and maintenance?

Building a robust content model and workflow is a team effort. The functionality of the CMS and the designs they are capable of producing is what brings the Editorial, Marketing, Digital and IT teams together. Giving them the visibility into each other's work streams allows them to collaborate. This collaboration also gives the various team members collective ownership over the content experiences within their organizations.

We want to make your project a success.

Let's Chat.

PreviousNext: Ok Drupal - talking to Drupal

Planet Drupal - 22. Januar 2018 - 22:57

In November 2017 I presented at Drupal South on using Dialogflow to power conversational interfaces with Drupal.

The video and slides are below, the demo in which I talk to Drupal starts in the first minute.

by Lee Rowlands / 23 January 2018 Tagged Conversational UI, Drupal 8, Chatbots, DrupalSouth

WeKnow: Survival guide to Backup & Restore MongoDB

Planet Drupal - 22. Januar 2018 - 21:06
Survival guide to Backup & Restore MongoDB

Despite being on the market for over a decade, to many, MongoDB still carries a mythical tone with a hint of ‘wizardry’.

The popular misconception is that MongoDB is only suitable for hip startups and former startups that are still considered ‘hip’ and out of the box, such as AirBnB.

Even with all the buzz and talk around MongoDB, the adoption rate remains relatively low in comparison with other ‘standard’ relational database technologies. Not many seem to understand that to be successful in the world of code you must approach everything new with an open mind.

Besides bearing an open mind, you need to incorporate an avenue to test and learn new technologies and tools. Personally, I choose to learn how to use new tools by trying to accomplish routine tasks.

enzo Mon, 01/22/2018 - 19:06

Ableton Live 10: Termin steht fest

heise online Newsticker - 22. Januar 2018 - 21:00
Ableton hat einen Veröffentlichungstermin seiner neuen Musik-Software bekannt gegeben. Bis dahin können registrierte Nutzer bereits die Beta ausprobieren.

Bitcoin: US-Behörde SEC bremst, Starökonom Shiller warnt vor Crash

heise online Newsticker - 22. Januar 2018 - 20:30
Mehrere Anbieter wollen Fonds auf Bitcoin und andere Kryptowährungen auflegen – doch die US-Börsenaufsicht SEC sieht da noch viele ungeklärte Fragen. Derweil warnt der US-Starökonom Robert Shiller vor einem Bitcoinkollaps.

Fuchsia: Bilder zeigen Googles drittes OS in Aktion

heise online Newsticker - 22. Januar 2018 - 18:30
Googles Fuchsia ist ein Betriebssystem mit eigenem Kernel und kommt als Android-Nachfolger in Frage. Erste Bilder zeigen es im Betrieb auf einem Pixelbook.

Age of Empires Definitive Edition erscheint am 20. Februar exklusiv für Windows 10

heise online Newsticker - 22. Januar 2018 - 18:30
Nach einer kurzfristigen Verschiebung erscheint die für 4K angepasste Age of Empires Definitive Edition am 20. Februar. Sie enthält auch die Erweiterung Rise of Rome, läuft aber nur unter Windows 10.

Apple Lisa: Als Apple die Maus von der Leine ließ

heise online Newsticker - 22. Januar 2018 - 18:00
Vor 35 Jahren brachte Apple einen revolutionären Bürocomputer auf den Markt. Die Lisa war zwar ein Flop, legte aber die Grundlagen für den Erfolg des Macintosh.

Unterstützung für Microsoft im US-Verfahren um Zugriff auf europäische Daten

heise online Newsticker - 22. Januar 2018 - 17:30
Der US Supreme Court entscheidet Ende Februar, ob das Gesetz der US-Regierung einen Zugriff auf Daten erlaubt, die nicht in den USA gespeichert sind. Microsoft erhält in dem Verfahren viel Unterstützung aus Europa.