Intel Core i-8000G: Kombiprozessoren mit leistungsfähiger Vega-Grafik für Notebooks

heise online Newsticker - 9. Januar 2018 - 9:30
Die leistungsfähigen Quad-Core-CPUs mit AMD-GPU und HBM2-Speicher ersetzen in flachen Notebooks Mobil-Grafikkarten. Intel verspricht genug Performance, damit aktuelle Spiele in Full-HD-Auflösung mit hohen Details flüssig laufen.

Sicherheitslücke bei Facebook ermöglichte Werbekunden Telefonnummernzugriff

heise online Newsticker - 9. Januar 2018 - 9:30
5000 Dollar Bug Bounty brachte einem europäischen Forscherteam das Aufspüren einer diffizilen Datenschutzlücke bei Facebook ein.

Meltdown und Spectre: Erste Klagen gegen Intel, Performanceprobleme kochen hoch

heise online Newsticker - 9. Januar 2018 - 9:30
In drei US-Staaten wurden wegen der Sicherheitslücken in Intel-Prozessoren Klagen eingereicht. Die Kläger streben eine Sammelklage an – unter anderen wegen Performance-Einbußen. Die hatte auch schon Epic Games als Grund für Fortnite-Downtimes beklagt.

Dolby Vision und HDR10+: Panasonics neuer UHD-BD-Player soll erstmals beide HDR-Formate unterstützen

heise online Newsticker - 9. Januar 2018 - 9:00
Nach einem Forbes-Bericht präsentiert Panasonic auf der CES den ersten Player für Ultra HD Blu-rays, der die beiden konkurrierenden dynamischen HDR-Formate unterstützt.

Netzleitstandsimulator soll Steuerung der Stromverteilung effektiver machen

heise online Newsticker - 9. Januar 2018 - 9:00
Wenn wegen Überkapazitäten Kraftwerke vom Netz genommen werden müssen, geschieht das bisher manuell. An der Uni Magdeburg gibt es jetzt ein System, das Stromnetze simuliert und dabei helfen soll, deren Steuerung zu automatisieren.

Grüne und FDP fordern Abschaffung des Netzwerkdurchsetzungsgesetzes

heise online Newsticker - 9. Januar 2018 - 9:00
Das erst seit Jahresbeginn geltende Netzwerkdurchsetzungsgesetz steht massiv unter Beschuss. FDP und Grüne fordern eine Novelle. Das kommt für die SPD aber weiterhin nicht infrage.

Berliner Polizei-Chef verteidigt Twitter-Auftritt

heise online Newsticker - 9. Januar 2018 - 8:30
Mit ihrem Twitter-Auftritt war die Berliner Polizei 2014 eine der ersten Behörden, die den Kurznachrichtendienst auf diese Weise nutzte. Kritiker finden, die Ordnungshüter sollten sich lieber auf ihre Kernaufgaben konzentrieren.

Meltdown und Spectre: Update für Windows 10 legt einige PCs lahm

heise online Newsticker - 9. Januar 2018 - 8:30
Das von Microsoft eilig bereitgestellte Update KB4056892 führt laut Nutzerberichten auf einigen AMD-Systemen zu einem Bootfehler und lässt sich auf anderen PCs nicht installieren.

US-Astronaut John Young gestorben

heise online Newsticker - 9. Januar 2018 - 3:00
Der Astronaut John Young, ein Pionier der bemannten Raumfahrt, ist am Freitag an den Folgen einer Lungenentzündung gestorben.

Palantir: The Commonwealth of Massachusetts

Planet Drupal - 9. Januar 2018 - 1:45
The Commonwealth of Massachusetts brandt Mon, 01/08/2018 - 17:45 Helping Massachusetts Improve the State of the Web

Helping improve the digital experience for constituents.

Highlights
  • Migration to flexible, open-source platform

  • Restructure of content for easy search

  • User-centric design based on common tasks

We want to make your project a success.

Let's Chat. Our Client

Home to more than 6.8 million people, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is the most populous state in New England. Like everywhere in the U.S., those 6.8 million people rely on their state government to provide them with services and support, which includes providing the information they need to perform vital tasks required by law. Whether those tasks include renewing a driver’s license, applying for food assistance, or registering a new business, constituents need to be able to find relevant information efficiently. Mass.gov is the flagship website for the Commonwealth, and its main goal is to provide online support to its constituents.

The Challenge

The challenge facing the Commonwealth was two-fold, one part a challenge for the constituents of Massachusetts, and one part a technology problem for the government dedicated to serving those people. The Commonwealth’s website reflected its internal organizational structure instead of organizing content in a way that made sense to its users. The old site also was on an antiquated, proprietary content management system that had not been able to address changing needs over time and was about to be decommissioned.

The Solution

Complex problems are best solved by having smart and talented people think and work passionately. It was a privilege for Palantir to be part of a team that included designers and strategists from another vendor, along with data scientists, content authors, and developers from the Commonwealth’s Executive Office of Technology Services and Security (EOTSS). This multi-party engagement saw many opinions and thoughts brought to light and explored, as the various groups coalesced into a single, functional team.

The team knew all of Mass.gov’s information needed to be pulled together into a constituent-focused model, so the team took a data-driven approach that began with using proxy indicators (search being one of them) to determine what top tasks users were trying to complete online. This allowed Palantir to build a framework to serve content related to those tasks. By figuring out what people were trying to accomplish on the site (such as renewing a driver’s licence or reserving a campsite in a state park), the Mass.gov team would then be able to write helpful content about those items.

In a nutshell, the main goals were to:

  • Identify high-value content
  • Write related high-value content
  • Structure that content in a way that was intuitive to constituents

The minimum viable product was a proof of concept focused on 10 of the most common tasks performed on Mass.gov. A scalable framework was then built for any pages after those initial 10. By taking this approach, Palantir was able to help prove value in the tools chosen for this project quickly, which helped EOTSS validate that the tasks highlighted were useful to the constituents. It also validated that the process of entering content was scalable for Mass.gov’s editorial team.

After the first 10 pages, the team worked with the rest of Mass.gov’s content based on the concept that 20% of the site’s content addresses 80% of constituents needs. The team identified the top 20% of content by traffic (and deleted a large amount of unnecessary or redundant content), and then started optimizing the new Drupal 8 platform. Placing focus on constituents first throughout the entire build helped frame conversations and decisions for Palantir’s development team. From the way layouts were considered to feedback mechanisms, focusing outcomes on “what is best for the constituents” gave everyone on the team a common place from which to start any conversation.

Flexibility in Drupal 8

Undertaking a large overhaul of a public service is no easy feat. From 2003 to 2012 alone, only 6.4% of federal IT projects with $10m in labor costs were successful; a whopping 93.7% failed.

In choosing Drupal as the framework for the new Mass.gov site, the Commonwealth was able to execute its vision with an extremely versatile tool. Unlike its previous CMS, building on Drupal meant the ability to pivot easily and adapt to changing needs. As more feedback was received from stakeholders and constituents during the first year of the engagement, the needs of the project changed a lot. Drupal also provided a stable platform of established tools, eliminating the need to build important features from scratch, thus helping to minimize costs in quickly getting to a working version of the site.

“We’ve redesigned Mass.gov for you, the people of the Commonwealth. We have one goal: to make it easy for you to find what you need.” — Mass.gov homepage

The Results

For Mass.gov, the big win is for the constituents of Massachusetts. Bay Staters now have a website designed specifically to help them accomplish their goals. The new Mass.gov site is an accessible, mobile-friendly, platform for the future that cuts down on the time users spend wandering through the site, trying to find what they need.

We want to make your project a success.

Let's Chat. Drupal 8 mass.gov

Mediacurrent: UX Design Evolution: Top UI/UX Design Trends for 2018

Planet Drupal - 8. Januar 2018 - 23:56

As we begin a fresh, brand-spanking-new year, several UX design practices and technologies stand out as the most exciting and relevant. While they are not all necessarily bleeding edge or super trendy, these considerations are becoming more and more vital to our clients and will be at the forefront in the year to come and beyond. Here’s an overview of what we’re watching, how the UX landscape is shifting, its impact on marketing and consumer experience, and what it means to you!

Elevated Third: Drupal’s Release Cycle: Understanding What’s Next

Planet Drupal - 8. Januar 2018 - 22:13
Drupal’s Release Cycle: Understanding What’s Next Drupal’s Release Cycle: Understanding What’s Next Nick Switzer Mon, 01/08/2018 - 13:13

We’re officially two years past the release of Drupal 8.0.0, arguably the most important release of Drupal to date. Drupal 8 is loaded with game-changing features and has more now than the day it was released. All this is thanks to what may be one of the least talked about, most impressive features: a completely overhauled release cycle.

Whether you realize it or not, if you use Drupal (7 or 8) you are affected by these changes and should have a clear understanding of what’s in store for the Drupal project while planning future projects and budgets. To shed some light on what the future holds, I’ll walk through how releases have worked in the past, how they work now and what we have to look forward to. As an added bonus, we’ll briefly discuss the pros and cons of migrating from Drupal 7 to 8, so stick around until the end!

The Past: How releases worked through Drupal 7

Until Drupal 8 was released on November 19, 2015, Drupal was known for a notoriously slow release cycle that focused on security updates and bug fixes in supported releases. These releases are numbered as incrementing versions of the major release - for example, 7.1, 7.2, 7.3, all the way up through the current major release: 7.56. Active development and improvement were typically focused much more on the next major release of Drupal. This allowed core developers to direct a lot of development time towards large changes in upcoming releases of Drupal, which could leave current versions of Drupal core feeling relatively stagnant. The D7 release cycle relied on the contrib ecosystem to fill gaps in functionality that may have been better suited to Drupal core.

The Present: How does Drupal 8 release updates and how does this mesh with the Drupal 7 release cycle?

With Drupal 8, the dream of frequent feature updates in core has become a reality. With the release of Drupal 8, Drupal core has officially moved to a number system called Semantic Versioning. The basic idea of Semantic Versioning, sometimes called “semver,” is to regulate when and what features are released as part of a software project. Rather than using versions with just two numbers, Drupal 8 uses three, for example, the current release of Drupal 8 is 8.4.3 (find a translated version of the release notes here).

With Semantic Versioning, each number has a distinct purpose: the first number is the major version (8), the second number is a minor release (.4) and the third number is a patch release. Each type of release has specific requirements that I won’t get into here, but you can visit the release cycle page of drupal.org for more detailed information. On top of the requirements for each type of release, there are specific dates and times they will--or can--occur. A major release occurs much less frequently than the other two. In fact, major releases are infrequent enough that there is not a set schedule for future major release of Drupal. Minor releases are scheduled every six months, so we can expect two minor releases in the upcoming year (2018). 8.5.0 will be released on 3/7/2018 and 8.6.0 will be released on 9/5/2018. Finally, patch releases have a month release window that can be used to address bugs in the current minor release.

If you skimmed that last paragraph, slow down and pay attention here. The most important thing to know about minor releases in Drupal 8 is that only the most current, stable minor release will receive security updates. Occasionally, there may be an exception if a minor release is really new, but I wouldn’t count on that happening often, if at all. To further clarify, Drupal 8.4 is the current minor release, so if you’re running 8.0, 8.1, 8.2 or 8.3, you will not receive security updates and are at risk.

Now that we’re all clear on the Drupal 8 release cycle, it’s also important to keep in mind that this does not change anything about the Drupal 7 release cycle. Drupal 7 is still supported by the community but is essentially in maintenance mode. At this point, we strongly advise against building any new sites on Drupal 7 unless you have a very compelling reason to do so - we haven’t had a reason to build a new site on Drupal 7 in over 18 months.  

The Future: What do we have to look forward to?

The future looks very bright for the Drupal project. Drupal 8 is a truly powerful platform that is capable of supporting a huge variety of enterprise projects and ambitious digital experiences. The release cycle adopted by Drupal 8 helps push the project forward in a lot of major ways because it makes rapid iteration much more possible.

The most exciting part of this whole thing is this: Drupal 9 will not be a completely breaking update in the same way every major release of Drupal has been. What this means for Drupal 8 site owners is that Drupal 9 will not require a ground-up rebuild!

That all sounds good, but when should I upgrade?

This is a tough question to answer because the reality of a site rebuild/upgrade can mean such drastically different things to different people. The Drupal community supports two current major releases of Drupal, meaning that right now, Drupal 7 and 8 are both supported and actively receiving security updates. No release date has been announced for Drupal 9, but as soon as Drupal 9 is released, Drupal 7 will no longer receive security updates and will become a potential vulnerability issue for anyone still using it.

At the very least, it is absolutely the right time to start planning and budgeting for a Drupal 8 build. You can count on a much less complicated upgrade process in the future. Moreover, Drupal 8, along with the ecosystem of contributed modules, is stable, powerful and a vital tool for anyone looking for an innovative, ambitious web presence.

For more on Drupal 8, download our whitepaper.

Download asset

OhTheHugeManatee: I'm Joining Microsoft, Because They're Doing Open Source Right

Planet Drupal - 8. Januar 2018 - 21:32

I’m excited to announce that I’ve signed with Microsoft as a Principal Software Engineering Manager. I’m joining Microsoft because they are doing enterprise Open Source the Right Way, and I want to be a part of it. This is a sentence that I never believed I would write or say, so I want to explain.

First I have to acknowledge the history. I co-founded my first tech company just as the Halloween documents were leaked. That’s where the world learned that Microsoft considered Open Source (and Linux in particular) a threat, and was intentionally spreading FUD as a strategic counter. It was also the origin of their famous Embrace, Extend, and Extinguish strategy. The Microsoft approach to Open Source only got more aggressive from there, funneling money to SCO’s lawsuits against Linux and its users, calling OSS licensing a “cancer”, and accusing Linux of violating MS intellectual property.

I don’t need to get exhaustive about this to make my point: for the first decade of my career (or more), Microsoft was rightly perceived as a villain in the OSS world. They did real damage and disservice to the open source movement, and ultimately to their own customers. Five years ago I wouldn’t have even entertained the thought of working for “the evil empire.”

Yes, Microsoft has made nice movements towards open source since the new CEO (Satya Nadella) took over in 2014. They open sourced .NET and Visual Studio, they released Typescript, they joined the Linux Foundation and went platinum with the Open Source Initiative, but come on. I’m an open source warrior, an evangelist, and developer. I could see through the bullshit. Even when Microsoft announced the Linux subsystem on Windows, I was certain that this was just another round of Embrace, Extend, Extinguish.

Then I met Josh Holmes at the Dutch PHP Conference.

First of all, I was shocked to meet a Microsoft representative at an open source conference. He didn’t even have bodyguards. I remember my first question for him was “What are you doing here?”.

Josh told me a story about visiting startup conferences in Silicon Valley on behalf of Microsoft in 2007, and reporting back to Ballmer’s office:

“The good news is, no one is making jokes about Microsoft anymore. The bad news is, they aren’t even making jokes about Microsoft anymore.”

For Josh, this was a big “aha” moment. The booming tech startup space was focused on Open Source, so if Microsoft wanted to survive there, they had to come to the table.

That revelation led to the creation of the Microsoft Partner Catalyst Team. Here’s Josh’s explanation of the team and its job, from an interview at the time I met him:

“We work with a lot of startups, at the very top edge of the enterprise mix. We look at their toughest problems, and we go solve those problems with open source. We’ve got 70 engineers and architects, and we go work with the startups hand in hand. We’ll sit down for a little pair programming with them, sometimes it will be a large enough problem that will take it off on our own and we’ll work on it for a while, and we’ll come back and give them the code. Everything that we do ends up in Github under typically an MIT or Apache license if it’s original work that we’re doing on our own, or a lot of times we’re actually working within other open source projects.”

Meeting with Josh was a turning point for my understanding of Microsoft. This wasn’t just something that I could begrudgingly call “OK for open source”. This wasn’t just lip service. This was a whole department of people that were doing exactly what I believe in. Not only did I like the sound of this; I found that I actually wanted to work with this group.

Still, when I considered interviewing with Microsoft, I knew that my first question had to be about “Embrace, Extend, and Extinguish”. Josh is a nice guy, and very smart, but I wasn’t going to let the wool be pulled over my eyes.

Over the next months, I would speak with five different people doing exactly this kind of work at Microsoft. I I did my research, I plumbed all my back-channel resources for dirt. And everything I came back with said I was wrong.

Microsoft really is undergoing a fundamental shift towards Open Source.

CEO Sadya Nadella is frank that closed-source licensing as a profit model is a dead-end. Since 2014, Microsoft has been transitioning their core business from licensed software to platform services. After all, why sell a license once, when you can rent it out monthly? So they move all the licensed products they can online, and rent, instead of selling them. Then they rent out the infrastructure itself, too – hence Azure. Suddenly flexibility is at a premium. As one CTO put it, for Azure to be Windows-only would be a liability.

This shift is old news for most of the world. As much as the Hacker News crowd still bitches about it as FUD, this strategic direction has been in and out of the financial pages for years now. Microsoft has pivoted to platform services. Look at their profits by product over the last 8 years:

The trend is obvious: server and platform services are the place to invest. Office only remains at the top of the heap because it transitioned to SaaS. Even Windows license profits are declining. This means focusing on interoperability. Make sure everything can run on your platform, because anything else is to handicap the source of your biggest short- and medium-term profit. In fact, remaining adversarial to Open Source would kill the golden goose. Microsoft has to change its values in order to make this shift.

So much for financial and strategic direction; but this is a hundred-thousand-person company. That ship doesn’t turn on a dime, no matter what the press releases tell you. So my second interview question became “How is the transition going?” This sort of question makes people uncomfortable: the answer is either transparently unrealistic, or critical of your environment and colleagues. Over and over again, I heard the right answer: It’s freakin’ hard.

MS has more than 40 years of proprietary development experience and institutional momentum. All of their culture and systems – from hiring, to code reviews, to legal authorizations – have been organized around that model. That’s very hard to change! I heard horror stories about the beginning of the transition, having to pass every line of contribution past the Legal department. I heard about managers feeling lost, or losing a sense of authority over their own team. I heard about development teams struggling to understand that their place in an OSS project was on par with some Rando Calrissian contributor from Kansas. And I heard about how the company was helping people with the transition, changing systems and structures to make this cultural shift happen.

The stories I heard were important evidence, which contradicted the old narrative I had in my head. Embrace, extend, extinguish does not involve leadership challenges, or breaking down of hierarchies. It does not involve personal struggle and departmental reorganization. The stories I heard evidenced an organization trying a real paradigm shift, for tens of thousands of people around the world. It is not perfect, and it is not finished, but I believe that the transition is real.

When you accept that Microsoft is trying to reorient its own culture to Open Source, suddenly all those “transparent” PR moves you dismissed get re-framed. They are accomplishments. It’s incredibly difficult to change the culture of one of the biggest companies in the world… but today, almost half of Azure users run Linux. Microsoft’s virtualization work made them the fifth largest contributor to the 3.x Linux kernel. Microsoft maintains the biggest project on Github (by contributor count). They maintain a BSD distribution and a Linux distribution. And a huge part of LXD (the container-based virtualization system for Linux) comes from Microsoft’s work with Canonical.

That’s impressive for any company. But Microsoft? It boggles the mind. This level of contribution is not lip-service. You don’t maintain a 15 thousand person community just for PR. Microsoft is contributing as much or more to open source than many other major players, who have had this in their culture from the start (Google, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn…). It’s an accomplishment, and it’s impressive!

In the group I’m entering, a strong commitment to Open Source is built into the project structure, the team responsibilities, and the budgeting practice. Every project has time specifically set aside for contribution; developers’ connections to their communities are respected and encouraged. After a decade of working with companies who try to engage with open source responsibly, I can say that this is the strongest institutional commitment to “giving back” that I have ever seen. It’s a stronger support for contribution than I’ve ever been able to offer in any of my roles, from sole proprietor to CTO.

This does mean a lot more work outside of the Drupal world, though. I will still attend Drupalcons. I will still give technical talks, participate, and help make great open source communities for Drupal and other OSS projects. If anything, I will do those things more. And I will do them wearing a Microsoft shirt.

Microsoft is making a genuine, and enormous, push to being open source community members and leaders. From everything I’ve seen, they are doing it extremely well. From the outside at least, this is what it looks like to do enterprise Open Source The Right Way.

Chaos und strenge Symmetrie: Die Bilder der Woche (KW1)

heise online Newsticker - 8. Januar 2018 - 21:00
Markante Formen und Farben dominierten die Bilder der Woche zum Jahresanfang. Während viele der Motive menschengemacht sind, hat andernorts auch die Natur ihre zeichnerische Begabung unter Beweis gestellt.

Drupal Console: Drupal Console 1.4.0

Planet Drupal - 8. Januar 2018 - 20:30

Drupal Console 1.4.0 is out. The newest release contains several bug fixes, one new command, and one compatibility break related to chain command's placeholder definition.

Chinesische Telecom-Firmen sollen angeblich Zugang zu VPN blockieren

heise online Newsticker - 8. Januar 2018 - 20:00
Ab dem 1. Februar sollen chinesische Telecom-Unternehmen dafür sorgen, dass ihre Kunden keinen Zugang zu VPN-Diensten mehr haben.

Missing Link: Street View verrät Wahlverhalten oder Datenschutz mit KI aushebeln

heise online Newsticker - 8. Januar 2018 - 20:00
Forschern ist es gelungen, mithilfe von Deep Learning aus öffentlich verfügbaren Google-Straßenaufnahmen auf soziale, wirtschaftliche und politische Muster in Stadtvierteln zu schließen. Wie bei ähnlichen KI-Verfahren gibt es Datenschutzbedenken.

Was war. Was wird. Von Revolutionen in Zeiten stabiler Mentalitäten

heise online Newsticker - 8. Januar 2018 - 19:30
Optimismus! Visionen! Träume! Von wegen. Nicht einmal die Sicherheitsalb-Träume werden so wahr, wie Experten erwarteten. Dafür geben manche Leute mit einer "Konservativen Revolution" der Zukunft eine fürchterlich hässliche Fratze, beklagt Hal Faber.

Acer Nitro 5: Gaming-Notebook mit Ryzen-CPU

heise online Newsticker - 8. Januar 2018 - 19:30
Acer kombiniert im 15,6-Zoll-Notebook Nitro 5 eine AMD-CPU mit einer AMD-GPU.

Acer zeigt Notebook-Flunder Swift 7 mit größerem Bildschirm

heise online Newsticker - 8. Januar 2018 - 18:00
Acer hat die 2018er-Version seines edlen Notebooks Swift 7 noch flacher gemacht, den Bildschirm vergrößert und ihm ein LTE-Modem spendiert.