iX-Sonderheft Programmieren jetzt im Handel

heise online Newsticker - 4. Mai 2018 - 17:30
Maschinelles Lernen, Webapps mit JavaScript, Python und die neuen Standards C++17 und C++20: Das neue iX kompakt liefert viele Informationen zu aktuellen Programmiertrends.

Lullabot: Eat This, It’s Safe: How to Manage Side Effects with Redux-Saga

Planet Drupal - 4. Mai 2018 - 17:01

Functional programming is all the rage, and for good reason. By introducing type systems, immutable values, and enforcing purity in our functions, to name just a few advantages, we can reduce the complexity of our code while bolstering our confidence that it will run with minimal errors. It was only a matter of time before these concepts crept their way into the increasingly sophisticated front-end technologies that power the web.

Projects like ClojureScript, Reason, and Elm seek to fulfill the promise of a more-functional web by allowing us to write our applications with functional programming restraints that compile down to regular ol’ JavaScript for use in the browser. Learning a new syntax and having to rely on a less-mature package ecosystem, however, are a couple roadblocks for many who might be interested in using compile-to-JS languages. Fortunately, great strides have been made in creating libraries to introduce powerful functional programming tenets directly into JavaScript codebases with a gentler learning curve.

One such library is Redux, which is a state-management tool heavily inspired by the aforementioned Elm programming language. Redux allows you to create a single store that holds the state of your entire app, rather than managing that state at the component level. This store is globally-available, allowing you to access the pieces of it that you need in whichever components need them without worrying about the shape of your component tree. The process of updating the store involves passing the store object and a descriptive string, called an action, into a special function called a reducer. This function then creates and returns a new store object with the changes described by the action.

This process is very reliable. We can be sure that the store will be updated in exactly the same way every single time so long as we pass the same action to the reducer. This predictable nature is critical in functional programming. But there’s a problem: what if we want our action to fire-off an API call? We can’t be sure what that call will return or that it’ll even succeed. This is known as a side effect and it’s a big no-no in the FP world. Thankfully, there’s a nice solution for managing these side effects in a predictable way: Redux-Saga. In this article, we’ll take a deeper look at the various problems one might run into while building their Redux-powered app and how Redux-Saga can help mitigate them.

Prerequisites

In this article, we’ll be building an application to store a list of monthly bills. We’ll focus specifically on the part that handles fetching the bills from a remote server. The pattern we’ll look at works just the same with POST requests. We’ll bootstrap this app with create-react-app, which will cover most of the code I don’t explicitly walkthrough.

What is Redux-Saga?

Redux-Saga is a Redux middleware, which means it has access to your app’s store and can dispatch its own actions. Similar to regular reducers, sagas are functions that listen for dispatched actions. Additionally, they perform side effects and return their own actions back to a normal reducer.

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By intercepting actions that cause side effects and handling them in their own way, we maintain the purity of Redux reducers. This implementation uses JS generators, which allows us to write asynchronous code that reads like synchronous code. We don’t need to worry about callbacks or race conditions since the generator function will automatically pause on each yield statement until complete before continuing. This improves the overall readability of our code. Let’s take a look at what a saga for loading bills from an API would look like.

1 import { put, call, takeLatest } from 'redux-saga/effects'; 2 3 export function callAPI(method = 'GET', body) { 4 const options = { 5 headers, 6 method 7 } 8 9 if (body !== undefined) { 10 options.body = body; 11 } 12 13 return fetch(apiEndpoint, options) 14 .then(res => res.json()) 15 .catch(err => { throw new Error(err.statusText) }); 16 } 17 18 export function* loadBills() { 19 try { 20 const bills = yield call(callAPI); 21 yield put({ type: 'LOAD_BILLS_SUCCESS', payload: bills }); 22 } catch (error) { 23 yield put({ type: 'LOAD_BILLS_FAILURE', payload: error }); 24 } 25 } 26 27 export function* loadBillsSaga() { 28 yield takeLatest('LOAD_BILLS', loadBills); 29 }

Let’s tackle it line-by-line:

  • Line 1: We import several methods from redux-saga/effects. We’ll use takeLatest to listen for the action that kicks-off our fetch operation, call to perform said fetch operation, and put to fire the action back to our reducer upon either success or failure.
  • Line 3-16: We’ve got a helper function that handles the calls to the server using the fetch API.
  • Line 18: Here, we’re using a generator function, as denoted by the asterisk next to the function keyword.
  • Line 19: Inside, we’re using a try/catch to first try the API call and catch if there’s an error. This generator function will run until it encounters the first yield statement, then it will pause execution and yield out a value.
  • Line 20: Our first yield is our API call, which, appropriately, uses the call method. Though this is an asynchronous operation, since we’re using the yield keyword, we effectively wait until it’s complete before moving on.
  • Line 21: Once it’s done, we move on to the next yield, which makes use of the put method to send a new action to our reducer. Its type describes it as a successful fetch and contains a payload of the data fetched.
  • Line 23: If there’s an error with our API call, we’ll hit the catch block and instead fire a failure action. Whatever happens, we’ve ended up kicking the ball back to our reducer with plain JS objects. This is what allows us to maintain purity in our Redux reducer. Our reducer doesn't get involved with side effects. It continues to care only about simple JS objects describing state changes.
  • Line 27: Another generator function, which includes the takeLatest method. This method will listen for our LOAD_BILLS action and call our loadBills() function. If the LOAD_BILLS action fires again before the first operation completed, the first one will be canceled and replaced with the new one. If you don’t require this canceling behavior, redux-saga/effects offer the takeEvery method.

One way to look at this is that saga functions are a sort-of intercepting reducer for certain actions. We fire-off the LOAD_BILLS action, Redux-Saga intercepts that action (which would normally go straight to our reducer), our API call is made and either succeeds or fails, and finally, we dispatch an action to our reducer that handles the app’s state update. Oh, but how is Redux-Saga able to intercept Redux action calls? Let’s take a look at index.js to find out.

1 import React from 'react'; 2 import ReactDOM from 'react-dom'; 3 import App from './App'; 4 import registerServiceWorker from './registerServiceWorker'; 5 import { Provider } from 'react-redux'; 6 import { createStore, applyMiddleware } from 'redux'; 7 import billsReducer from './reducers'; 8 9 import createSagaMiddleware from 'redux-saga'; 10 import { loadBillsSaga } from './loadBillsSaga'; 11 12 const sagaMiddleware = createSagaMiddleware(); 13 const store = createStore( 14 billsReducer, 15 applyMiddleware(sagaMiddleware) 16 ); 17 18 sagaMiddleware.run(loadBillsSaga); 19 20 ReactDOM.render( 21 <Provider store={store}> 22 <App /> 23 </Provider>, 24 document.getElementById('root') 25 ); 26 registerServiceWorker();

The majority of this code is standard React/Redux stuff. Let’s go over what’s unique to Redux-Saga.

  • Line 6: Import applyMiddleware from redux. This will allow us to declare that actions should be intercepted by our sagas before being sent to our reducers.
  • Line 9: createSagaMiddleware from Redux-Saga will allow us to run our sagas.
  • Line 12: Create the middleware.
  • Line 15: Make use of Redux’s applyMiddleware to hook our saga middleware into the Redux store.
  • Line 18: Initialize the saga we imported. Remember that sagas are generator functions, which need to be called once before values can be yielded from them.

At this point, our sagas are running, meaning they’re waiting to respond to dispatched actions just like our reducers are. Which brings us to the last piece of the puzzle: we have to actually fire off the LOAD_BILLS action! Here’s the BillsList component:

1 import React, { Component } from 'react'; 2 import Bill from './Bill'; 3 import { connect } from 'react-redux'; 4 5 class BillsList extends Component { 6 componentDidMount() { 7 this.props.dispatch({ type: 'LOAD_BILLS' }); 8 } 9 10 render() { 11 return ( 12 <div className="BillsList"> 13 {this.props.bills.length && this.props.bills.map((bill, i) => 14 <Bill key={`bill-${i}`} bill={bill} /> 15 )} 16 </div> 17 ); 18 } 19 } 20 21 const mapStateToProps = state => ({ 22 bills: state.bills, 23 error: state.error 24 }); 25 26 export default connect(mapStateToProps)(BillsList);

I want to attempt to load the bills from the server once the BillsList component has mounted. Inside componentDidMount we fire off LOAD_BILLS using the dispatch method from Redux. We don’t need to import that method since it’s automatically available on all connected components. And this completes our example! Let’s break down the steps:

  1. BillsList component mounts, dispatching the LOAD_BILLS action
  2. loadBillsSaga responds to this action, calls loadBills
  3. loadBills calls the API to fetch the bills
  4. If successful, loadBills dispatches the LOAD_BILLS_SUCCESS action
  5. billsReducer responds to this action, updates the store
  6. Once the store is updated, BillsList re-renders with the list of bills
Testing

A nice benefit of using Redux-Saga and generator functions is that our async code becomes less-complicated to test. We don’t need to worry about mocking API services since all we care about are the action objects that our sagas output. Let’s take a look at some tests for our loadBills saga:

1 import { put, call } from 'redux-saga/effects'; 2 import { callAPI, loadBills } from './loadBillsSaga'; 3 4 describe('loadBills saga tests', () => { 5 const gen = loadBills(); 6 7 it('should call the API', () => { 8 expect(gen.next().value).toEqual(call(callAPI)); 9 }); 10 11 it('should dispatch a LOAD_BILLS_SUCCESS action if successful', () => { 12 const bills = [ 13 { 14 id: 0, 15 amountDue: 1000, 16 autoPay: false, 17 dateDue: 1, 18 description: "Bill 0", 19 payee: "Payee 0", 20 paid: true 21 }, 22 { 23 id: 1, 24 amountDue: 1001, 25 autoPay: true, 26 dateDue: 2, 27 description: "Bill 1", 28 payee: "Payee 1", 29 paid: false 30 }, 31 { 32 id: 2, 33 amountDue: 1002, 34 autoPay: false, 35 dateDue: 3, 36 description: "Bill 2", 37 payee: "Payee 2", 38 paid: true 39 } 40 ]; 41 expect(gen.next(bills).value).toEqual(put({ type: 'LOAD_BILLS_SUCCESS', payload: bills })); 42 }); 43 44 it('should dispatch a LOAD_BILLS_FAILURE action if unsuccessful', () => { 45 expect(gen.throw({ error: 'Something went wrong!' }).value).toEqual(put({ type: 'LOAD_BILLS_FAILURE', payload: { error: 'Something went wrong!' } })); 46 }); 47 48 it('should be done', () => { 49 expect(gen.next().done).toEqual(true); 50 }); 51 });

Here we’re making use of Jest, which create-react-app provides and configures for us. This makes things like describe, it, and expect available without any importing required. Taking a look at what this saga is doing, I’ve identified 4 things I’d like to test:

  • The saga fires off the request to the server
  • If the request succeeds, a success action with a payload of an array of bills is returned
  • If the request fails, a failure action with a payload of an error is returned
  • The saga returns a done status when complete

By leveraging the put and call methods from Redux-Saga, I don’t need to worry about mocking the API. The call method does not actually execute the function, rather it describes what we want to happen. This should seem familiar since it’s exactly what Redux does. Redux actions don’t actually do anything themselves. They’re just JavaScript objects describing the change. Redux-Saga operates on this same idea, which makes testing more straightforward. We just want to assert that the API was called and that we got the appropriate Redux action back, along with any expected payload.

  • Line 5: first we need to initialize the saga (aka run the generator function). Once it’s running we can start to yield values out of it. The first test, then, is simple.
  • Line 8: call the next method of the generator and access its value. Since we used the call method from Redux-Saga instead of calling the API directly, this will look something like this:
{ '@@redux-saga/IO': true, CALL: { context: null, fn: [Function: callAPI], args: [] } }

This is telling us that we’re planning to fire-off the callAPI function as we described in our saga. We then compare this to passing callAPI directly into the call method and we should get the same descriptor object each time.

  • Line 11: Next we want to test that, given a successful response from the API, we return a new action with a payload of the bills we retrieved. Remember that this action will then be sent to our Redux reducer to handle updating the app state.
  • Line 12-40: Start by creating some dummy bills we can pass into our generator.
  • Line 41: Perform the assertion. Again we call the next method of our generator, but this time we pass-in the bills array we created. This means that when our generator reaches the next yield keyword, this argument will be available to it. We then compare the value after calling next to a call using the put method from Redux-Saga with the action.
  • Line 44-46: When testing the failure case, instead of plainly calling the next method on our generator, we instead use the throw method, passing in an error message. This will cause the saga to enter its catch block, where we expect to find an action with the error message as its payload. Thus, we make that assertion.
  • Line 48-50: Finally, we want to test that we’ve covered all the yield statements by asserting that the generator has no values left to return. When a generator has done its job, it will return an object with a done property set to true. If that’s the case, our tests for this saga are complete!
Conclusion

We’ve achieved several objectively useful things by incorporating Redux-Saga into our project:

  • Our async code has a more synchronous look to it thanks to the use of generators
  • Our Redux reducers remain pure (no side effects)
  • Our async code is simpler to test

I hope this article has given you enough information to understand how Redux-Saga works and what problems it solves, and made a case for why you should consider using it.

Further Reading

Header photo by Becky Matsubara

Autonome Autos: Unterwegs mit Continentals selbstfahrendem "Cruising Chauffeur"

heise online Newsticker - 4. Mai 2018 - 17:00
Autozulieferer Continental will seinen Kunden bis 2025 ein vollautomatisiertes Fahrpaket anbieten. Am Rande der Hannover Messe konnten wir auf der Autobahn "erfahren", was das System mit heutiger Serien-Sensorik leisten kann.

Trotz Automatisierung: "Es wird Arbeit geben"

heise online Newsticker - 4. Mai 2018 - 17:00
Es gibt immer mehr Arbeitsplätze, und die fortschreitende Automatisierung wird das nicht ändern. Diese optimistische These vertritt MIT-Wirtschaftswissenschaftler David Autor.

re:publica: Sascha Lobo plädiert für offensiven Sozial-Liberalismus

heise online Newsticker - 4. Mai 2018 - 17:00
Internet-Vordenker Sascha Lobo will dem Vormarsch autoritärer Bewegungen eine positive Zukunftsvision entgegensetzen. Gleichzeitig warnt er davor, unbequeme Probleme zu übersehen.

Tim Millwood: Drupal core Workspace module

Planet Drupal - 4. Mai 2018 - 16:46
Drupal core Workspace module

The Workspace entity was first seen in the contrib module Multiversion on 1st June 2014. Back then the entity type was called "Content repository", it was renamed to "Workspace" in September 2014.

On 22nd Febuary 2016 the Workspace module was created, which built upon the Multiversion module.

The Workflow Initiative was announced in Dries' keynote DrupalCon New Orleans.

Today the Workspace module landed in Drupal core as a new experimental module. This module is very different from the contrib Workspace module. It has no dependencies and now actually has a lot in common with the Drupal 7 module CPS.

Please give the module a try, join us in the issue queue, and help us get Workspace module beta ready for 8.6.0-alpha1 in just over 2 months time.

timmillwood Fri, 04/05/2018 - 15:46 Tags drupal planet drupal-planet drupal drupal8 drupal 8 drupal core Add new comment

Angetestet: Pixl.js - Espruino-Bastelboard mit Bluetooth und Display

heise online Newsticker - 4. Mai 2018 - 16:30
Dank Espruino können Entwickler Mikrocontroller in JavaScript programmieren. Der Erfinder Gordon Williams hat aber nicht nur den JavaScript-Interpreter entwickelt, sondern auch eigene Hardware. Sein neuester Streich heißt Pixl.js.

Spam: 40 Jahre Werbe-Mails

heise online Newsticker - 4. Mai 2018 - 16:00
Am 3. Mai vor 40 Jahren wurde die erste Spam-Mail an 320 Mail-Postfächer im Arpanet verschickt. Vor 20 Jahren endeten die Versuche der Firma Hormel Foods, ihr Markenzeichen "Spam" zu schützen.

Xiaomi geht an die Börse

heise online Newsticker - 4. Mai 2018 - 15:30
Aus dem veröffentlichten Börsenprojekt geht nicht hervor, auf wie viel Milliarden Dollar Xiaomi taxiert wird, in einem Medienbericht ist von 100 Milliarden die Rede.

Spotify: 75 Millionen Abonnenten, 169 Millionen US-Dollar Verlust

heise online Newsticker - 4. Mai 2018 - 15:30
Die ersten Quartalszahlen von Spotify nach dem Börsengang enttäuschen die Anleger. Gewinne sind nicht in Sicht, trotz des steten Zuflusses neuer Nutzer.

Agaric Collective: Creating a New Social Simple Button

Planet Drupal - 4. Mai 2018 - 15:11

Sharing an article via a social network is a super common task requested on a project.

Fortunately for Drupal 8 there is a module for that called Social Simple. This module allows you to display the most popular networks in a node so the user can just click any of the buttons and share the article.

By default this module provides the following buttons:

  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • Linkedin
  • Google plus

This will cover 90% of use cases, but what if we need to add a button for a new network?

Creating a Custom Social Simple Button

The Social Simple module is already supports custom buttons, we just need to let the module know that we want to add one.

Basically what we need to do is:

  • Create a class that implements SocialNetworkInterface.
  • Register this class in our services file.
  • Add the tag social_simple_network to our service.

For our example we are going to create a basic Mail button. We start by creating a custom module. Inside our module let's create a Mail php file inside of the src/SocialNetwork folder:

mkdir -p src/SocialNetwork cd src/SocialNetwork touch Mail.php

The next step is to create a class and implement the SocialNetworkInterface which interface has the following methods:

  • getShareLink: This is the most important method. It must return a rendered array which later Drupal will use to create the button.
  • getLabel: Here we will need to provide the name of our button. In our case Mail.
  • getId: The ID of the button. We can choose any ID here, we just need to make sure that it is unique. Let's use mail for our example.
  • getLinkAttributes: These attributes are going to be passed to the link. We can add custom parameters to the link in this part.

Our class looks like this:

namespace Drupal\social_simple\SocialNetwork; use Drupal\Core\Entity\EntityInterface; use Drupal\Core\StringTranslation\StringTranslationTrait; use Drupal\Core\Url; /** * The Mail button. */ class Mail implements SocialNetworkInterface { use StringTranslationTrait; /** * The social network base share link. */ const MAIL = 'mailto:'; /** * {@inheritdoc} */ public function getId() { return 'mail'; } /** * {@inheritdoc} */ public function getLabel() { return $this->t('Mail'); } /** * {@inheritdoc} */ public function getShareLink($share_url, $title = '', EntityInterface $entity = NULL, array $additional_options = []) { $options = [ 'query' => [ 'body' => $share_url, 'subject' => $title, ], 'absolute' => TRUE, 'external' => TRUE, ]; if ($additional_options) { foreach ($additional_options as $id => $value) { $options['query'][$id] = $value; } } $url = Url::fromUri(self::MAIL, $options); $link = [ 'url' => $url, 'title' => ['#markup' => '' . $this->getLabel() . ''], 'attributes' => $this->getLinkAttributes($this->getLabel()), ]; return $link; } /** * {@inheritdoc} */ public function getLinkAttributes($network_name) { $attributes = [ 'title' => $network_name, ]; return $attributes; } }

The next step is to let the social network know about our new button and we do this by adding this class as a service in our module.services.yml. If you are not familiar with this file, you can read the structure of a service file documentation..

Basically we need to add something like this:

services: social_simple.mail: class: Drupal\custom_module\SocialNetwork\Mail tags: - { name: social_simple_network, priority: 0 }

Next, we just need to rebuild the cache. Now when we visit the social simple configuration we will see our new button there, ready to be used.

The only thing that we need to pay extra attention to is that the Social Simple module will just search the services with the tag social_simple_network otherwise our class will not be found

If you want to see how the whole thing is working, you can check this patch that I made as a part of a project: https://www.drupal.org/project/social_simple/issues/2899517. As a bonus, I made an initial integration with the Forward module.

re:publica: ARD will Aktivismus nicht zum Grundprinzip von Journalismus machen

heise online Newsticker - 4. Mai 2018 - 14:30
Ist Neutralität in den Nachrichten angesichts erhitzter Debatten in Online-Foren zum Relikt geworden? Jein, meinen ZDF-Moderatorin Dunja Hayali und ARD-aktuell-Chef Kai Gniffke. Bei persönlichen Kommentaren im Netz bewege man sich auf einem schmalen Grat.

Battletech angespielt: Kampfkolosse unter sich

heise online Newsticker - 4. Mai 2018 - 14:30
In Rundentaktikspiel Battletech duellieren sich riesige Kampfmaschinen um die Vorherrschaft in der Galaxis. Ein Fest für Tüftler und Taktiker, die sich mit technischen Schönheitsfehlern abfinden können.

iX-Workshop: Continuous Integration mit Jenkins

heise online Newsticker - 4. Mai 2018 - 14:30
Der Workshop am 21. und 22. Juni erklärt den Einsatz des CI-Werkzeugs Jenkins zu Umsetzung einer agilen Software-Entwicklung und -Verteilung von Anfang an.

Amazee Labs: Slack integration as a debugging tool

Planet Drupal - 4. Mai 2018 - 14:19
Slack integration as a debugging tool

We use Slack to communicate internally as well as with our clients, but we also make use of it in different ways that help us deliver a better service to both groups of stakeholders.

Fran Garcia-Linares Fri, 05/04/2018 - 14:19

Slack vs Email

Whilst we still use emails when the situation requires, we always try to move the communication related to our projects to slack. Most of our clients are in slack in their own dedicated channel, which happens to be the same one that all designers, developers, project managers, etc. use for communications related to the project. 

This way, everybody involved in the project is aware of what’s going on. Information gets passed easily across the team and we avoid multiple “broken telephone” situations. Also, if the person who is usually responsible for something happens to be sick or on holiday, the rest of the team can assist instead of getting an unhelpful “Out of Office” reply.

Different Integrations

Slack and its bots are part of our Global Maintenance team too (I guess they can be considered remote workers). They help us with our day to day tasks in a myriad of ways. 

  • Activity Channel: we use slack integrations that will pull any message or activity related to the tickets that the team is taking care of in the current sprint. This can get a bit noisy sometimes but it’s a wonderful way to stay informed of what’s going on on our team board. No more email and Jira issue watching.


     
  • Think about Blaize: it’s not just a reminder to think about Blaize (which we also do) who lives in New Zealand, it’s also a reminder for the UTC timezone team to starting wrapping up the day, commit everything not yet committed, update tickets not yet updated and leave things ready for Blaize, who will tell us “Good morning” at our 8~9pm (his 7~8am).


     
  • Information about important events: we have multiple integrations for regular but important events on certain projects, for peace of mind, and to make people aware that something has happened. The following examples are to inform everyone that an automatic Mailchimp list was created (this is crucial for the client) and to inform developers that a deployment has happened (and whether it went well or not - red vs green).




     
  • Instant bug reporting: this is probably the most important one and the one that is making the biggest difference to our Global Maintenance team. We use it whenever there are bug reports that we can’t replicate because the data changed, or when we don’t have enough information to take an action. If we can’t fully resolve a ticket request, we’re very likely to create an integration that will “spot” a problem and give us useful realtime information so that we can debug knowing further information about the issue. Over the past few months we’ve done this in multiple projects and it not only gives us instant feedback, it also informs everyone on the channel that something is happening, so we can be alert and take an action if needed. Below are two examples of those situations, again on critical parts of our clients’ systems, that allowed us to take quick action. 



These are just a few samples of the multiple integrations we have. If you want to know a bit more about the technical part, just keep reading.

How to do the integration?

  • Create the slack webhook: here.

  • Use the Drupal slack module (recommended) or code your own function, which could be as simple as:

  • Call the desired function:

    • Using slack module:


      Using custom module:

That’s it really, as you can see it’s not too complex but it adds huge value to our day to day work.

Forscher suchen nach prähistorischen Hightech-Zivilisationen

heise online Newsticker - 4. Mai 2018 - 14:00
Gab es auf der Erde vor Jahrmillionen hochentwickelte Zivilisationen, von denen wir noch nichts wissen? Wissenschaftler grenzen die möglichen Spuren ein.

Spectre-NG: Intel-Prozessoren von neuen hochriskanten Sicherheitslücken betroffen, erste Reaktionen von AMD und Intel

heise online Newsticker - 4. Mai 2018 - 13:00
Acht neue Sicherheitslücken – vier davon hochriskant – haben Forscher in Intel-Prozessoren gefunden. Das belegen Informationen, die c't exklusiv vorliegen.

#heiseshow, live ab 12 Uhr: Blockaden und Krypto-Streit – Geht's jetzt den Messengern an den Kragen?

heise online Newsticker - 4. Mai 2018 - 13:00
Messenger wie WhatsApp und Signal geraten immer mehr in den Fokus und vor allem die Verschlüsselung wird immer schärfer kritisiert. Woher die neuen Angriffe kommen und wie gefährlich sie sind, besprechen wir in einer neuen #heiseshow.

Blockchain, Container, DSGVO: Wiener Linuxwochen auf der Höhe der Zeit

heise online Newsticker - 4. Mai 2018 - 12:30
Drei Tage lang treffen sich Linux-Fans und Open-Source-Entwickler in Wien zu mehr als 130 Vorträgen und Workshops. Ein Filmfestival ist auch wieder Teil der Konferenz. Der Eintritt ist, wie immer, kostenlos.

Facebook-Datenskandal: Cambridge Analytica macht dicht

heise online Newsticker - 4. Mai 2018 - 11:30
Kundenschwund und gestiegene Anwaltskosten im Zuge des Facebook-Datenskandals bringt auch die Dachgesellschaft SCL Group dazu, das Geschäft zu beenden.