Einheitliche USB-C-Ladegeräte in der EU sollen kommen

heise online Newsticker - 7. Juni 2018 - 8:00
Mehrere große IT-Unternehmen haben ein Memorandum of Understanding unterzeichnet, das USB Typ C als verbindlichen Ladestandard für Smartphones vorsieht.

Facebook: Gleiches Recht auf Datenschutz für alle Nutzer weltweit

heise online Newsticker - 7. Juni 2018 - 7:30
Facebook hat den Schritt, die Daten von 1,5 Milliarden Nutzern von Irland in die USA zu verschieben, mit nicht weltweit anwendbaren Vorgaben der DSGVO begründet

Comcast vs. Fox: Britische Regierung macht Weg frei für Bieterwettbewerb um Sky

heise online Newsticker - 7. Juni 2018 - 7:00
Der Murdoch-Konzern 21st Century Fox als auch der US-Kabelkonzern Comcast haben grünes Licht erhalten für einen möglichen Erwerb von Sky.

Apple Design Awards 2018: Apple zeichnet hervorragende Apps aus

heise online Newsticker - 7. Juni 2018 - 7:00
Mit dem begehrten Preis hat Apple wieder besonders innovative Apps ausgezeichnet – die Hälfte der Auszeichnungen ging an europäische Entwickler.

GOG Summer-Sale: Was taugen die Spiele-Schnäppchen?

heise online Newsticker - 7. Juni 2018 - 7:00
Die Gaming-Plattform GOG hat ihren Summer-Sale gestartet: Ein PC-Spiel wird verschenkt, auf weitere gibt es teils große Rabatte. Was taugen die Schnäppchen?

Nach Steam-Ablehnung: Apple reglementiert Remote-Desktop-Apps

heise online Newsticker - 7. Juni 2018 - 7:00
Apple will verhindern, dass Remote-Desktop-Apps eigene Software-Läden aufs iPhone schmuggeln. Dies scheint auch der Grund für die Blockade von Steam Link.

BSA: Jedes fünfte PC-Programm hierzulande unlizenziert

heise online Newsticker - 7. Juni 2018 - 7:00
Der Anteil illegal genutzter Software gehe weltweit zwar zurück, sei aber immer noch zu hoch, will die Software-Allianz BSA herausgefunden haben.

Medizinische Daten aufs Handy: Systemübergreifende Gesundheitsapp Vivy

heise online Newsticker - 7. Juni 2018 - 6:00
Mit der Gesundheitsapp Vivy sollen 20 Millionen Versicherte die Herrschaft über ihre medizinischen Daten übernehmen. Erstmals sind private Versicherer dabei.

orkjerns blogg: Creating services with optional dependencies in Drupal 8

Planet Drupal - 6. Juni 2018 - 22:54
Creating services with optional dependencies in Drupal 8 admin Thu, 06/07/2018 - 11:08

Today I encountered a problem I did not think about earlier. After I pushed a fix to a project I am working on, the CI builds started showing errors. And the problem was coming from a message like this:

The service "mymodule.attachments_manager" has a dependency on a non-existent service "metatag.manager".

In many cases when you see that, it probably means your module was installed before a module it depends on. For example, in this case, it would seem that this module depends on metatag, and so declaring it as a dependency would fix the issue. And for sure, it would. But sometimes dependencies are not black and white.

This particular service does some handling of the attachments when used together with metatag. It does so, because it is a module we use across projects, and we can not be sure metatag is used in any given project. So it's only used in a way that is something like this:

/** * Implements hook_page_attachments(). */ function mymodule_page_attachments(array &$attachments) { if (!\Drupal::moduleHandler()->moduleExists('metatag')) { return; } \Drupal::service('mymodule.attachments_manager')->handlePageAttachments($attachments); }

Now, what this means, is that for the attachments manager to be useful, we need metatag. If we do not have metatag, we do not even need this service. So basically, the service depends on metatag (as it uses the service metatag.manager), but the module does not (as it does not even need its own service if metatag is not installed).

Now, there are several ways you could go about fixing this for a given project. Creating a new module that depends on metatag could be one way. But today, let's look at how we can make this service have an optional dependency on another service.

At first the service definition looked like this:

mymodule.attachments_manager: class: Drupal\mymodule\MyModuleAttachmentsManager arguments: ['@current_route_match', '@module_handler', '@metatag.manager', '@entity.repository']

This would contruct a class instance of MyModuleAttachmentsManager with the following function signature:

public function __construct(RouteMatchInterface $route_match, ModuleHandlerInterface $module_handler, MetatagManager $metatag_manager, EntityRepositoryInterface $entity_repo) { }

Now, this could never work if this module was installed before metatag (which it very well could, since it does not depend on it). A solution then would be to make the metatag.manager service optional. Which is something we can do by removing it from the constructor and create a setter for it.

public function __construct(RouteMatchInterface $route_match, ModuleHandlerInterface $module_handler, EntityRepositoryInterface $entity_repo) { // Constructor code. } /** * Set meta tag manager. * * @param \Drupal\metatag\MetatagManager $metatagManager * Meta tag manager. */ public function setMetatagManager(MetatagManager $metatagManager) { $this->metatagManager = $metatagManager; }

OK, so far so good. It can now be constructed without having a MetaTagManager. But how do we communicate this in the service definition? Turns out the documentation for Symfony service container has the answer.

When you define a service, you can specify calls to be made when creating the service, which would be ignored if the service does not exist. Like so:

mymodule.attachments_manager: class: Drupal\mymodule\MyModuleAttachmentsManager arguments: ['@current_route_match', '@module_handler', '@entity.repository'] calls: - [setMetatagManager, ['@?metatag.manager']]

So there we have it! The service can be instantiated without relying on the metatag.manager service. And if it is available in the service container, the method setMetatagManager will be called with the service, and our service will have it available in the cases where we need it.

Now let's finish off with an animated gif related to "service container".

Vardot: Why Choose Drupal 8 to Migrate from your Legacy CMS?

Planet Drupal - 6. Juni 2018 - 22:21
Ahmed Jarrar June 6, 2018

If your business has been around for a while, there’s a fair chance that your site is running on a Legacy CMS. These outdated frameworks were a step above hardcoding (literally writing the entire site using, say, HTML), but don’t do the modern business any favors in the way of swift and cost-effective site design.

The challenge for enterprises still running on a Legacy framework is clear: “Which modern CMS will help us make things easier for ourselves?”

This article will cover what seems to us like the clear contender for the best of today’s CMS solutions --Drupal 8. We’ll cover the ease with which companies can migrate their content to Drupal 8, the thriving community around it, and other reasons why leading companies across various industries trust the platform to power their websites.

 

Top Organizations Run with Drupal 8

 

Drupal 8 is the preferred framework for a significant number of the world’s most influential brands. Pinterest, The Economist, Tesla, Al Jazeera --and countless other industry leaders prefer Drupal 8 for its agility and scalability.

If belonging to a wide group of peers isn’t enough to prove the platform’s reliability, then trust in the fact that the open market is more than happy to throw its weight behind the product-of-choice for its biggest spenders. Thanks to its prominence among elite organizations and businesses, over a million developers have flocked to Drupal --making Drupal-based designs highly accessible for those with a relatively smaller pool of resources.

 

Drupal 8 is Supported by a Thriving Community

 

Thanks to the framework’s prominence among big businesses, migrating to Drupal 8 means gaining access to a wide network of developers and innovators building additions to a single product. As a result, the options available to a business are staggering: e-commerce sites can choose from thousands of templates for their online storefronts, news sites can integrate chatbots, and services can manage volumes of content across multiple channels.

Since its foundation, Vardot has been an active member of this community. We can say with confidence that the platform has been crucial in our mission: to help the world’s most influential companies accomplish their own missions.

 

Drupal 8 Offers Risk-Free Migration

 

A major concern for people and organizations looking to modernize their digital assets is the fear of losing content while switching to a new CMS. The process is supposed to reduce cost and boost convenience --so it’s only natural to worry about having to restructure an entire network of websites or reproduce existing content.

This concern is a thing of the past for Drupal users since the platform was designed for high flexibility. Essentially, it allows users to import vast and complex site architecture from legacy systems, removing the need to play around with a sales funnel that already works for you, or rebuild your site’s blog from scratch.

If anything, making the move might actually increase the performance of your website. It takes the liberty of mapping out your existing URLs and updating them to meet the standards of the best SEO practices --meaning users will have a much easier time discovering your content and, hopefully, develop into sales-ready leads. Likewise, it eliminates redundant modules left over from your initial infrastructure and offers a clean database system right out of the box, meaning your site load times will be faster than ever (great for SEO, and great for generating conversions!)

 

Drupal 8 Offers Easy-to-Use Solutions

 

Legacy CMS platforms often demand much from users looking to update their websites. Since most new tools don’t bother aiming for compatibility with legacy systems, organizations looking to take advantage of AI, voice search, and other top-of-the-line innovations will have to build them up from scratch.

Drupal 8, on the other hand, offers plenty of valuable features right out of the box. These core features allow businesses and organizations of all kinds design powerful and functional websites suited to achieve whatever goals they’ve set. Even better, Drupal is open to 3rd party integrations like Salesforce, chatbots, and tools for both social media and customer support.

Businesses shouldn’t have to fall behind in an age when software is growing exponentially. With all the technology available to grow your sales and revenue, you don’t want to lag behind for a second.

 

Drupal is Perfect for Your Non-Technical Staff

 

We’ve mentioned that Drupal is scalable --meaning it can grow as big as your company needs it to grow in as fast of a time as your company needs. The developers you’ve hired are guaranteed a simple time with it, and so are the people responsible for populating your site: your marketers, writers, and designers.

The best websites are mentally and visually stimulating, which is why people pay so much to keep them looking pretty. Migrating to Drupal 8 allows you to scale back on training hours (no more need for your new hires to learn clunky, outdated systems) and put your I.T. team to more productive use.

 

Case Study - American University of Cairo (AUC)

 

The AUC website was first to build using the iAPPS CMS: a Sharepoint content hub for microsites OpenAm, and other features. The result was a confusing hodgepodge of unnecessary applications that clashed to produce a fractured website. AUC, as you can imagine, didn’t thrive in the digital world under these conditions.

When Vardot helped AUC migrate from Sharepoint to Drupal, the institution felt the changes instantly. Their website had a much stronger impact from that point forward and stopped being a headache for the university’s administrators to update. In short, migrating to Drupal helped AUC run a much better website.

 

Conclusion

Drupal 8 is, by all accounts, vastly superior to legacy CMS platforms. It’s arguably superior to CMS platforms that came much later --and the thriving community behind it is unlikely to stop broadening the limits of what the framework is capable of any time soon.

For a good investment in your organization’s future, make the move away from your legacy system and switch to Drupal. You’ll find it highly secure, cost-effective, and easy to set up.

Community: Looking back at the first-ever DrupalCon Teamwork and Leadership Workshop

Planet Drupal - 6. Juni 2018 - 20:59

The Drupal Community Working Group (CWG), with support from the Drupal Association, organized and held the first-ever Teamwork and Leadership Workshop at DrupalCon Nashville on April 10, 2018. The goal of the three-hour workshop was to explore teamwork, leadership, and followership in the context of the Drupal community as well as to help provide support and resources for people in the Drupal community who work alongside others in teams and/or may find themselves in positions of responsibility or leadership. Additionally, we hoped to expand the base of people who can step into leadership positions in the Drupal community, and to help those who may already be in those positions be more effective.

The workshop was led by Drupal Association board chair Adam Goodman, who generously donated his time. Adam is the head of Northwestern University’s Center for Leadership, and he works as an executive coach and advisor to senior executives and boards of directors at dozens of companies and organizations around the world. 

As part of the planning for the workshop, Adam asked us to enlist a number of facilitators to help with the various workshop exercises. In addition to three CWG members (Jordana Fung, George Demet, and Mike Anello), the following community members also facilitated: Donna Benjamin, Shyamala Rajaram, Gábor Hojtsy, Angie Byron, and Tiffany Farriss. The facilitators met with Adam prior to the workshop to understand what would be expected of them. 

We wanted to make sure that we invited a diverse range of people to the workshop who are doing awesome work with Drupal around the world, including those whose efforts may not be as well-known or recognized (yet).  We set an internal goal of at least 50% of attendees to be from populations historically underrepresented at DrupalCon, including those who self-identify as women, non-gender binary, people of color, and/or people who are not from Europe, the United States, or Canada.. To this end, prior to the public registration period, we sent out invitations to 64 community members, 75% of whom were from an under-represented cohort. We invited people who are involved in all aspects of the community including (but not limited to) event organizers, sprint organizers, project maintainers, as well as past and current Aaron Winborn Award nominees. At the workshop, there were a total of 50 attendees (there were a total of 60 seats available), with approximately 64% from underrepresented cohorts. 

Attendees were seated at round tables of approximately 10 people per table. The first half of the workshop was focused on large group exercises that focused on helping attendees think about what it meant to be a leader and a team member. We talked about keeping perspective as team members and not jumping to conclusions about each other's behaviors based on an often (extremely) limited set of data. The second half of the workshop focused on smaller group exercises in which individuals responded to various prompts and then discussed them as a small (table-sized) group. 

A few days after the workshop, we asked the attendees to complete an 11-question follow-up survey. Of the 50 attendees, we had 17 responses for a 33% response rate. We asked what their expectations were for the workshop; representative responses included:

I thought it would be a workshop on leadership, but I was surprised by the approach to the Drupal community.

Didn't know what to expect. So...none

The fact that we had multiple responses indicating that the expectations were not clear tells us that we need to do a better job in communicating exactly what the goals and activities of the workshop will be in the future. 

On a scale of 1-5, 73% of respondents indicated that the workshop met their expectations (via a rating of 4 or 5). 

We also asked respondents to share an insight from the workshop. Responses included:

Transition planning for responsibilities you take on and having a plan in place before even taking on the responsibility.

The need to know why each person on the team is present (their motivation) and the importance of unified movement toward a goal.

I hadn't written out what leadership looked like to me before, so I found that part of the exercise to be quite helpful.

The survey also found that the attendees found more value in the smaller group exercises than the large group exercises (81.3% vs. 60%), with 81.3% indicated they'd be interested in attending future similar workshops.

Many of the open ended responses indicated that some attendees were hoping for more practical, hands-on advice for specific situations. In addition, several of the responses felt that parts of the exercises felt rushed, and wished there was more time. Finally, several attendees commented on the appropriateness of some of the imagery used in one of the workshop exercises, for which the CWG made a public apology following the event. We have gone through all of the comments relating to aspects of the event that were considered negative or unhelpful and will take this into consideration on how we can improve the workshop for the future.

Overall, we feel the workshop was a success, and something that has been long overdue for the Drupal community. We've been discussing how we can make similar content available to everyone in the community, not just DrupalCon attendees. We're open to ideas for future workshops on these topics (and format), let us know if you have any ideas.
 

"Wir machen das dicht": Apple will Tracking über Like-Buttons aushebeln

heise online Newsticker - 6. Juni 2018 - 19:30
Der Apple-Browser Safari weist künftig auf Tracking durch Share- und Like-Buttons hin und fragt um Erlaubnis. Dies richtet sich vor allem gegen Facebook.

Bilderkennung: Google Lens als eigenständige Android-App

heise online Newsticker - 6. Juni 2018 - 19:00
Google Lens steht als Stand-Alone-App im Google Play Store bereit. Die Anwendung funktioniert jedoch nicht auf allen aktuellen Android-Smartphones.

"Signalpiraterie"-Vertrag: Extraschutz für Signale von Rundfunkanbietern

heise online Newsticker - 6. Juni 2018 - 18:30
Der Zombie unter den völkerrechtlichen Verträgen zum Schutz von Rechteinhabern ist zurück. Mitglieder der WIPO empfehlen eine diplomatische Konferenz.

Drupal blog: Virtual reality on campus with Drupal

Planet Drupal - 6. Juni 2018 - 18:16

This blog has been re-posted and edited with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog. Please leave your comments on the original post.

One of the most stressful experiences for students is the process of choosing the right university. Researching various colleges and universities can be overwhelming, especially when students don't have the luxury of visiting different campuses in person.

At Acquia Labs, we wanted to remove some of the complexity and stress from this process, by making campus tours more accessible through virtual reality. During my presentation at Acquia Engage Europe yesterday, I shared how organizations can use virtual reality to build cross-channel experiences. People that attended Acquia Engage Europe asked if they could have a copy of my video, so I decided to share it on my blog.

The demo video below features a high school student, Jordan, who is interested in learning more about Massachusetts State University (a fictional university). From the comfort of his couch, Jordan is able to take a virtual tour directly from the university's website. After placing his phone in a VR headset, Jordan can move around the university campus, explore buildings, and view program resources, videos, and pictures within the context of his tour.

All of the content and media featured in the VR tour is stored in the Massachusetts State University's Drupal site. Site administrators can upload media and position hotspots directly from within Drupal backend. The React frontend pulls in information from Drupal using JSON API. In the video below, Chris Hamper (Acquia) further explains how the decoupled React VR application takes advantage of new functionality available in Drupal 8.

It's exciting to see how Drupal's power and flexibility can be used beyond traditional web pages. If you are interesting in working with Acquia on virtual reality applications, don't hesitate to contact the Acquia Labs team.

Special thanks to Chris Hamper for building the virtual reality application, and thank you to Ash Heath, Preston So and Drew Robertson for producing the demo videos.

ZenBook Pro: Asus-Notebooks mit Touchscreen als Touchpad

heise online Newsticker - 6. Juni 2018 - 18:00
In den neuen ZenBook-Pro-Notebook dient ein kleiner Touchscreen in der Handballenablage sowohl als Touchpad als auch als zweiter Bildschirm.

Apples WWDC-Keynote 2018: Die Highlights im Video

heise online Newsticker - 6. Juni 2018 - 17:30
Apple hat am Montagabend alle vier Betriebssysteme in neuen Versionen vorgestellt. Unser Video zeigt die Zusammenfassung zu iOS 12, macOS Mojave und mehr.

EuGH: Betreiber von Facebook-Fanseiten sind für Datenschutz mitverantwortlich

heise online Newsticker - 6. Juni 2018 - 17:30
Betreiber von Fanseiten auf Facebook müssen umdenken. Laut Europäischem Gerichtshof sind sie so wie auch Facebook selbst für den Datenschutz verantwortlich.

Drupalgeddon 2: Immer noch über 115.000 Drupal-Webseiten verwundbar

heise online Newsticker - 6. Juni 2018 - 17:30
Noch immer gibt es tausende Drupal-Webseiten, die über eine kritische Lücke angreifbar sind. Sicherheitsupdates sind seit über zwei Monaten verfügbar.

Drupal Association blog: Email news after GDPR

Planet Drupal - 6. Juni 2018 - 17:09

GDPR took effect last month, and many organizations sent policy updates to your inbox. We took action on our email lists to acquire explicit consent from all subscribers. You can read about other action we took to prepare for GDPR, but this post is all about what we communicate about through the Drupal email list.

The Drupal email list had almost 64,000 subscribers receiving various newsletters from our programs, and we knew running a re-consent campaign would have an impact on the number of subscribers in each of our newsletter groups. It seemed worth the potential loss, because numbers don't always tell the full story of the impact communications can, and do, make for an organization.

There were two problems with our list that kept us from delivering tailored messages with the Drupal community: old or insufficient data on subscribers and limited newsletter options. To make the list more effective, we changed the structure of our subscriptions to focus on the type of message we're sending, rather than being aligned with Drupal Association programs.

By using Mailchimp's GDPR tools and suggestions to run a re-consent campaign, we asked for explicit consent to this new subscription structure. We enabled the Marketing Preferences section provided by Mailchimp, and now in order to get email, you must select Email within that section of the form. This has been confusing for some people. Here is an easy way to look at it: The top section, where you choose your lists, is simply choosing the topics that interest you; the bottom section, where you click “email” in marketing preferences gives us explicit permission to email you about these topics.

The impact of running the re-consent campaign has been a loss of a vast majority of our list. Is this a problem? It depends. Ideally, only people who want to read our news are now subscribed and we will see an increase in open rates. And hopefully community members won’t be hearing about updates or announcements from other sources, rather than from our newsletters first - if you do, please let us know.

Please take a moment and check that your subscription settings are how you want them. If you want to receive news, check the Email box under Marketing Preferences. (Enter your email address in this form and you'll get a message to update your subscription)

If you are in any way interested in Drupal, you don't want to miss our messages. In particular, Bob Kepford (kepford) does a fantastic job of curating content for the Drupal Weekly Newsletter. There's something for everyone, every Thursday. Likewise, the special offers messages from our partners can help you learn about and save money on services. Thanks for keeping informed!

There are some communications which are not impacted by our subscription structure change. These include security notifications, blog post notifications, Drupal.org system messages, and any transactional messages - for instance, if you register to attend DrupalCon, we will still email you about DrupalCon.